How to Balance Your Podcast Production Business with Life – PEM0031

Running a podcast production business can be hard.

We know it can be hard to balance all the things that need to get done in order for your podcast production business to grow and thrive. But we also know how important it is not let those things take over your life, so you don't end up looking back years later and realizing everything was out of balance, that you’re unhealthy, and that your kids and cats hate you.

That's why we're here to share our tips on keeping your podcast production business balanced without letting it take over! You'll learn about ways you can keep yourself sane while still running a successful company.

Listen now as we share our tips for keeping your podcast production business balanced without letting it take over. You'll learn about ways you can keep yourself focused on what matters most, like family time or exercise, while still making sure there are enough hours in the day for work.  

Listen to Discover

  • What we might be missing when it looks like other people are just crushing it in their businesses.
  • What we need to remind ourselves of when we start comparing ourselves to others.
  • How being a business owner instead of an employee can make this comparison game and the never-ending race to the undefined finish even worse.
  • What we need to define as business owners so that we can begin to set boundaries that are healthy.
  • How each of the Yetis struggle with boundaries and healthy use of their time in different ways.
  • What we should look for instead of balance (hat tip to Britany Felix).
  • Some of the things we juggle besides podcast production work and family.
  • The value of estimating how much time will be needed to complete something (even if it’s wrong).
  • How regular check-ins with a business partner or trusted friend can make a difference.
  • How sometimes bringing someone in to accomplish a single short-term goal can make all the difference in freeing up time both now and later.
  • Some hacks to help get as much done as quickly as possible when you’re at your best (and how to protect client deadlines using margin).
  • Planning for surge capacity.
  • Using a “probability to break” thought exercise to identify what to work on first.

Links & Resources

Guest Editor

This episode of the Podcast Editors Mastermind was edited by Jude Harrington. If you're looking for an editor and like what you hear, connect with Jude at https://www.mcuneedtoknow.com/

Be a Guest

If you're a podcast editor, we'd love to see if you'd be a fit for a future episode. Fill out this form to let us know you're interested, and we'll contact you to see if it's a good fit.

Your Yetis Are

About the Podcast Editors Mastermind

The Podcast Editors Mastermind is for professional podcast editors who want to grow their business and get more clients. We’re creating a community of like-minded professionals that are passionate about the art and science of editing podcasts.

Our goal is to help you build your business by providing tools, resources, and support so you can focus on what matters most—your craft. This isn’t just another group where everyone talks about how great they are at podcast editing; we show our work!

Follow or subscribe and take the Podcast Editors Mastermind with you today!

Transcript
Daniel Abendroth:

So how much is that

Bryan Entzminger:

welcome to the podcast?

Bryan Entzminger:

Editors mastermind the podcast for podcast editors and professional

Bryan Entzminger:

podcast service providers that want to focus on the business side

Bryan Entzminger:

of podcast editing and providing that service to your clients today.

Bryan Entzminger:

We've got a topic that we think is going to be really valuable

Bryan Entzminger:

because it's something that we've struggled with from time to time.

Bryan Entzminger:

And it's all about making sure that.

Bryan Entzminger:

As you're editing, you don't allow the editing to take over your life

Bryan Entzminger:

that you have a business and a life and a family, and you don't look back

Bryan Entzminger:

20 years from now and have your kids or your cats hate you forever because

Bryan Entzminger:

you didn't spend any time with them.

Bryan Entzminger:

Before we get to that, though, we are going to take just a

Bryan Entzminger:

second and introduce ourselves.

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm Brian at Springer, you can find me@toptieraudio.com and to my side is.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

I'm Carrie Caulfield.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Eric, you can find

Daniel Abendroth:

:

me@yayapodcastingdotcomoroninstagramatcarrieericandiamdanielabendrothandyoucanfindmeatroughmedia.audio.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

And like the thing says, uh, on the screen, we are talking

Bryan Entzminger:

about time management tonight.

Bryan Entzminger:

I would like to mention that there are only three of us tonight, as we

Bryan Entzminger:

shared on the last episode, Jennifer's had to take a step back right now.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so.

Bryan Entzminger:

Interested in being a guest co-host for this show, we would love to

Bryan Entzminger:

talk to you about that opportunity.

Bryan Entzminger:

You can go to podcast editors, mastermind.com/be a guest,

Bryan Entzminger:

fill out that magical form.

Bryan Entzminger:

And assuming that the thing doesn't go to Daniel's spam email, then

Bryan Entzminger:

we'll get back to you and see if we can get you on the show.

Bryan Entzminger:

So this week's topic is one that actually came up as we were talking on the last

Bryan Entzminger:

episode, as we were recording, we were talking about some of the challenges

Bryan Entzminger:

and one of the things was around imposter syndrome and feeling like.

Bryan Entzminger:

Always have to be working so that you can in quotes, kind of crush it,

Bryan Entzminger:

but then not having a healthy life.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so we had a little bit of an interesting discussion.

Bryan Entzminger:

We think this is something that a lot of people struggle with.

Bryan Entzminger:

We're wondering maybe if this will be valuable to you as well.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I think as we kick this off, I think Daniel, you were the one that shared

Bryan Entzminger:

in the last episode first about like how imposter syndrome has you kind of

Bryan Entzminger:

wondering about this and, um, like some of the struggles that you have, do you

Bryan Entzminger:

mind taking just a minute to kind of talk about what you I shared before?

Daniel Abendroth:

I don't even remember what I shared before.

Daniel Abendroth:

Uh, perfect.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

So, um, A lot of the time, like you see other people like doing things

Daniel Abendroth:

like they're releasing courses or you see them active on social media.

Daniel Abendroth:

And then it's like, I look back and it's like, I'm not doing anything.

Daniel Abendroth:

Or it feels that way.

Daniel Abendroth:

At least I'm like, I'm just so focused on like doing the business,

Daniel Abendroth:

but then I'm not doing things.

Daniel Abendroth:

So one of my goals is to like build the business, but also build my brand.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I'm seen as like an authority in the podcasting space, as well as the authority

Daniel Abendroth:

on using Reaper for podcasts editing.

Daniel Abendroth:

But a part of that is like being active on social media and I'm just not doing that.

Daniel Abendroth:

And so it just feels like I'm missing out as I watch other people

Daniel Abendroth:

like completely kill it, at least on the outside, on social media.

Daniel Abendroth:

Whereas like I'm over here just like looking at my Instagram that

Daniel Abendroth:

I haven't posted in like two years and just feeling guilty about that.

Daniel Abendroth:

So that's why, that's why I don't share my Instagram handle because there's nothing.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Well, so to me, what it sounds like you're saying is

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

that aside from all the client work, there are all these other like marketing

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

tasks that you feel like you need to be doing to build your reputation, build

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

your sanding, and then these kinds of, um, networking things and, you know,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

uh, parallel products that you yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Or like I'll be

Daniel Abendroth:

scrolling through Facebook and I'll see an ad of

Daniel Abendroth:

somebody that's promoting, like their podcast editing service or whatever.

Daniel Abendroth:

It's like, oh, why am I not doing it?

Daniel Abendroth:

Oh

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I know exactly.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

That feeling gets me all the time.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I have to, it's really hard because I have to take a step

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

back and be like, it's okay.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

But I also want to just hide when I'm like, I'm not kidding.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Like, it makes me want to go.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Away and hide and not look at anything and not interact with anybody because

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

really you see, I see people doing all this cool stuff all the time and

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I'm like, why am I not doing that?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I, you know, so I can totally relate to that.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And it's, it's a challenge.

Daniel Abendroth:

And like what I, one thing I've done, I kind of deal with it.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like one, like I don't need to compete with them because like, my business is

Daniel Abendroth:

doing well, just doing what I'm doing.

Daniel Abendroth:

So like, I don't need to be active on social media to find clients, like,

Daniel Abendroth:

I don't need to do these other things because like, I'm doing fine without them.

Daniel Abendroth:

And if like, I don't get joy out of it.

Daniel Abendroth:

And it's a struggle then, like, is it really serving me?

Daniel Abendroth:

Like, I don't like posting on Instagram because like, it's

Daniel Abendroth:

not really my strong suit.

Daniel Abendroth:

So like I could force myself to do it, but then it's just like a chore.

Daniel Abendroth:

And now, like I'm very resistant to.

Bryan Entzminger:

Everything.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I think part of this maybe goes back to the thing that a lot of people

Bryan Entzminger:

don't talk about, the difference between being an employee or working for

Bryan Entzminger:

someone versus having your own business.

Bryan Entzminger:

Because if you work for someone, there's sort of an understanding

Bryan Entzminger:

that there's a certain amount of work for a certain amount of pay.

Bryan Entzminger:

And of course your job is to get the job done with the resources that you have.

Bryan Entzminger:

But at the end of the day, if you know, you have to decide along with the

Bryan Entzminger:

person that you work for, you report to, Hey, this is what I can get done.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so these are the expectations to be met.

Bryan Entzminger:

So for example, for my day job, I have a certain amount of work

Bryan Entzminger:

that I'm expected to accomplish.

Bryan Entzminger:

And we stay in con in conversation about how I'm progressing against that.

Bryan Entzminger:

But there's, there's no guard rails as an entrepreneur.

Bryan Entzminger:

You know, 40 hours or 50 hours or 60 hours and you're done.

Bryan Entzminger:

And on the one hand, that's sort of true in the sense that you'll probably always

Bryan Entzminger:

be thinking about and working on your business in your head, even if you're not

Bryan Entzminger:

like sitting at a computer doing stuff, but if you'll let it, it will take over

Bryan Entzminger:

your life and it'll be, instead of having a business, the business will have you.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I think that's something that I've, I've noticed.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I try to be careful about as I'm balancing work and family,

Bryan Entzminger:

and also owning a business.

Bryan Entzminger:

And for me, it's, it's a real challenge.

Bryan Entzminger:

I know that I've for some time, for some times I've occasionally

Bryan Entzminger:

maybe often gotten it wrong.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so like early on a Saturday morning, the kids are up and.

Bryan Entzminger:

A deadline that I want to get done and I'll have, you know, one of the kids

Bryan Entzminger:

will come in and want to talk to me and I'll be like, okay, we can talk for a

Bryan Entzminger:

minute, but I need to get this done.

Bryan Entzminger:

And like, why dad?

Bryan Entzminger:

Why are you always working?

Bryan Entzminger:

And I don't want to model an unhealthy lifestyle for my kids, but at the

Bryan Entzminger:

same time, there is a reality.

Bryan Entzminger:

There's an, there's an amount of work that needs to be done with what I'm doing.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I've, I've got some strategies that I apply.

Bryan Entzminger:

And we'll probably talk about those later, but I'm wondering, like, do you

Bryan Entzminger:

guys have similar experiences as well?

Bryan Entzminger:

Like w how, what does it look like?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Uh, oh, absolutely.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Um, that's one of the, my son's big complaints and he said that tonight to

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

me, like you're always working and I really do try to like, keep that balance.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Part of it is I really enjoy what I do.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

So like a lot of times I'm doing things and it doesn't feel like work.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

And that may be part of what you're saying.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Like, does the business have you, or do you have the business, but also.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

I have to stop and remember to spend time with my family make and not

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

just any time, but like quality time.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

So I've really been trying to put on those guard rails and it's

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

been a challenge, but like my, my husband even has said it to me.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

I mean, we had a whole thing.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Um, the other moms, you know, full disclosure about how I was always working.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

And sometimes it's hard because.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

What are you going to do?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

I mean, ultimately the job you're the boss, right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

And stuff needs to get done.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

And if, and, you know, even if you have a team or whatever, just

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

things have to get done and they have to get done in a timely manner.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

So sometimes you do need to work like a 16 hour day and you can't help it.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Um, sometimes that kind of dog piles on each other, you know, and

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

I have been finding this a challenge and I kind of like had this dream

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

of not being an entrepreneur.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Um, but I think that's because I go, when I go through these periods, it's

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

where I'm at, I'm working long hours.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

It's it's like, wouldn't it be nice to not have all the responsibility.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Wouldn't it be nice to be able to like leave work at work?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

So, you know, that is something that I've kind of.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

I don't know if it's strugglings is the right word, but I feel like that's kind

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

of where I am in my business right now.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Like I'm trying to put all these things in place, so we don't have to work as

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

much, but that's also time consuming.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

So it's, it is, it's a juggling act act.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

And I wouldn't say work life balance.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

I would just say constant, Brittany, Felix introduced me to this

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

like constant course correction.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

It is.

Bryan Entzminger:

Have you ever found yourself in a position where you had what

Bryan Entzminger:

looked like a great opportunity, but you just didn't have the time resources to

Bryan Entzminger:

pursue it and you had to turn it down.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Oh, all the time.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Like, I mean, what am I always say?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I've said for the past, like three years, no new work.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I don't want any more, any more clients, I wouldn't do any more work.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I kind of, you know, had to deal with this.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Recently.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I had to ask myself with this new project, like, do I have the bandwidth to do this?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I really had to consider it.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And my, you know, I wanted to do it so much.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I was like, well, if, if it becomes a bandwidth issue,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

then I will fire somebody.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I will fire a client to do it because I do want my, my own time

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

and want to be able to, you know, from my own health and my family.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Um,

Bryan Entzminger:

it's tough.

Bryan Entzminger:

How about you, Daniel?

Bryan Entzminger:

Have you ever had to turn something down?

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, I don't think I've turned down a concrete, like

Daniel Abendroth:

offer or anything, but just more like the idea, like I was wanting to do the

Daniel Abendroth:

Reaper course and that ended up being.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like I was getting everything prepared and it's just like the

Daniel Abendroth:

idea of recording, like 50 videos.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

It's just, then you got to edit them too

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

or pay somebody.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

And like, come up with a text to go along with it and like the titles.

Daniel Abendroth:

And it's just a lot of time there.

Daniel Abendroth:

And then, then they're just like the opportunities I think

Daniel Abendroth:

I need to do like being active on Instagram and Facebook ads.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like other things like that, or like, I really don't need to.

Daniel Abendroth:

The gurus tell you, you do so you feel like you need to, does that make sense?

Daniel Abendroth:

Oh yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

Especially if they have a course for $27 to get you started on.

Bryan Entzminger:

Exactly.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

Wait, I'm sorry.

Bryan Entzminger:

47.

Bryan Entzminger:It's:Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

And

Bryan Entzminger:

that,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

so that's another piece of the pie.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I think that we're talking about is because there's like work

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

life and, you know, family life.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And then there's also this kind of like continuing your education life.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Because there's always something to learn in what we do.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Like we like any entrepreneur, most of us didn't go to business school.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

We're learning this on the fly.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And there's a lot of stuff, especially in our work that you can't

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

necessarily go take a course on.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Either.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So it's a lot of like, you know, having to research and having to ask

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

people and figure it out on your own.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

But like yeah, like that, you know, like, do I need a Facebook ad course?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Do I need to take one?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Or, you know, I just invested in, in a year's worth of podcasting and

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

education really helpful, but it was really, I mean, I, I did turn

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

down work during that time and I, it was a challenge to get it all done.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah, it really was.

Bryan Entzminger:

So do you have like a structure that you look at the say,

Bryan Entzminger:

okay, you know, a certain amount of my time, let's say 10%, I'm making up a

Bryan Entzminger:

number of goes to continuing education and then the rest goes to something else.

Bryan Entzminger:

Like, how do you, no,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

that's, I'm not that organized, Brian.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, either I'm working on it, that's why I'm asking,

Bryan Entzminger:

like, this is, this is as much learning for me as anybody else.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

You know, something that I, I started therapy

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

and things, um, to address, like I actually went to see a therapist to

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

help address what these like, problems that come up in entrepreneurship, like

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

conflict to create with the family and the, um, work-life balance thing.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Cause it is eight.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It is that much of a challenge.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I don't want it, I'm getting older.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So like, my health is very important.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

One of the things that I realized, and I kind of knew this in the back of

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

my head is that I just I'm very late.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Spur of the moment.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I just be like, oh, this is really cool.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And here's the opportunity and I'm going to do it right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I don't necessarily think it all the way through and how much time it's going to

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

take and, and what that's gonna look like.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And then I always underestimate how, how much time?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I'm not like good at time.

Bryan Entzminger:

Well, I mean, you're the only person that

Bryan Entzminger:

never estimates time, right?

Bryan Entzminger:

Correct.

Bryan Entzminger:

Oh, wait.

Bryan Entzminger:

No, that's me

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

too.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So, um, it is definitely a challenge

Daniel Abendroth:

for me.

Daniel Abendroth:

So like having clear structure has been helpful.

Daniel Abendroth:

I haven't done that per se, but one thing that we've have done is so like Michelle

Daniel Abendroth:

is my wife slash business partner.

Daniel Abendroth:

We run the company.

Daniel Abendroth:

But I'm more involved in the finances of the company and she wants to be

Daniel Abendroth:

more, at least aware of what's going on.

Daniel Abendroth:

She doesn't want to be in the dark.

Daniel Abendroth:

And so we've set aside time every week to have a financial meeting and

Daniel Abendroth:

we're going to be treating it just the same as if this was a meeting

Daniel Abendroth:

with a client just as important.

Daniel Abendroth:

We haven't booked like have a recurring thing in my schedule.

Daniel Abendroth:

So that way nobody can book that time.

Daniel Abendroth:

And it's just the point as a client.

Daniel Abendroth:

So that way, like we are committed to having this meeting every week.

Daniel Abendroth:

And the same thing, one thing I used to do that I fallen out of is like, I

Daniel Abendroth:

know, um, My client work has a deadline.

Daniel Abendroth:

And so I know I'm going to do that no matter what.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I can afford to like, push that off later in the day and focus like

Daniel Abendroth:

earlier in the day to other things.

Daniel Abendroth:

So like, one thing I tried to do while back was like the morning time,

Daniel Abendroth:

like the first couple hours was on reading, like certain emails that

Daniel Abendroth:

helped me with my business, or like just focusing on the business in the

Daniel Abendroth:

morning and then doing client work later.

Daniel Abendroth:

So

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

can we talk about this a little bit?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Because it's something I've been thinking about, and that is when

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

am I the most productive and what should I be working on at that time?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I mean, you said Daniel, that you can push.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

You know, until later in the day?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Well, I can't like if I wake up early and I can get a lot of stuff

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

done before, like, you know, from like nine to two, I can take care

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

of all the, all the client work.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And, and I, I edit faster.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I have less interruptions.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Like I think that's something really important that you should pay attention

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

to is like, when are you most productive?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

What do you want to spend doing during that time?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

When are the least interruptions?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Because like afternoon, till evening, you know, especially

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

with our family, you know, Brian,

Bryan Entzminger:

no idea,

Daniel Abendroth:

never heard of it.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Um, it's just so much easier to when things are quiet and

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

you're focused to, you know, because I.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

We've been talking about this with my family is that, Hey, when you interrupt

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

me, it takes me about 30 minutes for me to get back onto a task as well.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So, you know, that is one thing I have been trying to pay attention to.

Bryan Entzminger:

So one of the things that you guys have talked about, I

Bryan Entzminger:

think is something that we probably need to bring up because as a podcast

Bryan Entzminger:

service provider, there's a tendency to think that what I do is edit, right.

Bryan Entzminger:

But that's only one out of five or six big things that you do in your business.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right?

Bryan Entzminger:

So there's current client, client work.

Bryan Entzminger:

There's the potential to build something for the future coursework

Bryan Entzminger:

or things that could be recurring, uh, giveaways, there's business development,

Bryan Entzminger:

there's general administration.

Bryan Entzminger:

And ideally, then there's that ongoing learning.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right?

Bryan Entzminger:

So for me, because I've got roughly.

Bryan Entzminger:

Call it 15 ish, maybe 20 hours a week.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's my workweek for business because I've got morning and night

Bryan Entzminger:

work day in the middle, and then some time on, on Saturdays, try and take

Bryan Entzminger:

the full day off on Sunday, spend time with family, try and keep the

Bryan Entzminger:

at least some semblance of balance.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so for me, I tend to focus almost entirely on those immediate

Bryan Entzminger:

client deadlines, the things that are generating revenue today, and

Bryan Entzminger:

the things that I fail on are largely the things that generate revenue

Bryan Entzminger:

tomorrow or continue to up-skill me.

Bryan Entzminger:

So, as an example, I bought a couple of courses at the beginning of the year.

Bryan Entzminger:

One of them on podcast management, one on filling your pipeline, your

Bryan Entzminger:

sales pipeline, that kind of stuff.

Bryan Entzminger:

When the client work started coming back about March, April, all of that

Bryan Entzminger:

personal development stuff fell off.

Bryan Entzminger:

It's not that I don't care, but I'm out of hours to do that.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I find that I try to put too much stuff on my plate.

Bryan Entzminger:

And, and I would encourage those of you that are listening.

Bryan Entzminger:

If you're thinking that the only thing you do is client work and you're going well,

Bryan Entzminger:

I can do 20 hours of client work a week.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's great.

Bryan Entzminger:

But if you've only got 20 hours a week, do better than I did figure out how to

Bryan Entzminger:

fit those other pieces in there as well.

Bryan Entzminger:

And allocate your time between those four or five or six big buckets of

Bryan Entzminger:

things to do that better than I am.

Bryan Entzminger:

Because frankly, if, if you do business development better than

Bryan Entzminger:

I do, unless you really suck as an editor, you're going to pass me.

Bryan Entzminger:

It's going to happen because business development is what grows your business.

Bryan Entzminger:

And that's one of the things I'm not doing.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I am currently in the process of setting up like all the automation

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

redoing my website completely and.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It is a time investment upfront.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I just, like I said to my stepdaughter today, I was like pleased.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And next time it's tax season.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Don't tell me not to do this,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

having, I guess, having an awareness and, you know, being aware of how much

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

time you have, and actually sitting down with a calendar, I think in hindsight,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I think would be helpful for me.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And last year I was much better at this as your, it I've kind of fallen

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

off the wagon, but I used to sit down in the, you know, every morning, every

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Monday morning and kind of plan out my week and then try to be, I was

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

tried to be more realistic about it.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And so I had been failing at that lately.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Oh, total, total fail.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I keep telling myself this because I don't, I re my notebook ran out of pages

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

and I can't find another pretty notebook to do it in, but I think that's BS.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I don't know what is, what is preventing me from doing it.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

But yeah, I really do need to get back to doing that because, uh, You

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

know, that I found really helpful.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So,

Daniel Abendroth:

so two thoughts have popped up one kind of talking about kind

Daniel Abendroth:

of, I think a little bit, what you're talking about Carrie is like properly

Daniel Abendroth:

estimating how long something takes.

Daniel Abendroth:

And so what's something I used to do is show you, so if you are watching

Daniel Abendroth:

the audio, I'll, I'll put a picture in the show notes, so you can see

Daniel Abendroth:

what I'm talking about, but this is kind of how I used to schedule my day.

Daniel Abendroth:

So this is like a seven week planner and on one side would be like my to-do list.

Daniel Abendroth:

And I would estimate how long each task would take me.

Daniel Abendroth:

And then on the right side, I would actually document what I

Daniel Abendroth:

actually did in that timeframe.

Daniel Abendroth:

And so if I think this show is going to take me an hour and

Daniel Abendroth:

that's what I budget for, but ends up taking me an hour and a half.

Daniel Abendroth:

I know next time, like make sure to give myself more time when I'm planning my day.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I found that to be quite helpful.

Daniel Abendroth:

Do you still do that?

Daniel Abendroth:

I don't.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Is that because you have now have a better

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

idea of how much time things

Daniel Abendroth:

take?

Daniel Abendroth:

I think so.

Daniel Abendroth:

Not necessarily, like, I know this show's going to take me 30 minutes.

Daniel Abendroth:

I know this show is pretty much like on Wednesday.

Daniel Abendroth:

I edit the shows and on Thursday at, at these shows in order to

Daniel Abendroth:

keep up with my deadline schedule.

Daniel Abendroth:

That's kind of how I do it.

Daniel Abendroth:

So wait, I have,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

so it's just on this thread, like when your clients

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

though, because they are the unpredictable thing in the business and not every

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

client is going to be consistent.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So what do you do when they're like, like I had a client who was sick

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

this week and he's like, oh, I can't get to the episode till tomorrow.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So how do you deal with that if you had scheduled to do it on like

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Wednesday and tomorrow's Friday?

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, so at least for this is true for me, my.

Daniel Abendroth:

The clients that are inconsistent are very consistent about it.

Daniel Abendroth:

I know which clients are the ones.

Daniel Abendroth:

And for some reason, there's one day like the, my clients that

Daniel Abendroth:

release on Thursdays seem to be the ones that struggle the most.

Daniel Abendroth:

I don't know why it's that particular day, but I know which clients are the

Daniel Abendroth:

ones that's going to be struggling.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I know like they released on Thursday, then I can schedule like Wednesday.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like I set aside set time aside Wednesday for their show.

Daniel Abendroth:

And if they don't get it to me in time, then like they get it to me like late.

Daniel Abendroth:

It's like, well, I can't do it this day.

Daniel Abendroth:

Thursday is when I'll get to it to release on Friday.

Daniel Abendroth:

Ha so the comment from see Mojica or Gado, I'm sorry if I butchered that haha.

Daniel Abendroth:

Client are the unpredictable thing, Carrie.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yes.

Daniel Abendroth:

And so I know I can set aside time, Wednesday and if they don't get it to

Daniel Abendroth:

me now, I have free time on Wednesday.

Daniel Abendroth:

And I don't have any clients that released Friday, Saturday, or Sunday.

Daniel Abendroth:

So like, I don't have any major deadlines on Thursday, so my

Daniel Abendroth:

Thursdays are pretty free.

Daniel Abendroth:

It's just kinda like working into the schedule based on their inconsistency.

Bryan Entzminger:

I think the hack that I use is I commit to seven day turnaround,

Bryan Entzminger:

but I can do much better than that.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so if things come in.

Bryan Entzminger:

All at the same time, I may have to prioritize things.

Bryan Entzminger:

So if I had say three different clients, I'll drop on the same day

Bryan Entzminger:

and ask for a short turnaround time.

Bryan Entzminger:

In that instance, I might have to say, sorry, I can't do it all.

Bryan Entzminger:

But in general, if somebody is, if I need to be a little bit flexible, I have that

Bryan Entzminger:

built in, and then that's something that I can offer them and say, Hey, you know,

Bryan Entzminger:

I could, I could go ahead and do this.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, because I mean, assuming that it's not a terrible interview with

Bryan Entzminger:

like five people on it, right.

Bryan Entzminger:

I can generally, well, I don't know that I've ever had five, four, probably.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

But yeah, those kinds of things I can do.

Bryan Entzminger:

And the other thing that I do, and I was talking to somebody this week,

Bryan Entzminger:

because I feel like there's a way that we should be able to reverse

Bryan Entzminger:

engineer this and make it predictive.

Bryan Entzminger:

But I track for every episode that I edit, I track.

Bryan Entzminger:

How, what was the duration of the raw audio?

Bryan Entzminger:

How many participants were there and how long did it take me to do the various

Bryan Entzminger:

parts of the editing so that if I get.

Bryan Entzminger:

A single track from one person where it's a monologue and it's 30 minutes.

Bryan Entzminger:

I know that that might take me an hour, hour and 15 minutes.

Bryan Entzminger:

If I get a monologue from another person who's not quite as well

Bryan Entzminger:

spoken, that might take an hour and a half to two hours to process.

Bryan Entzminger:

So it just, I do that kind of thing.

Bryan Entzminger:

And in my mind, I think there's gotta be a way to turn this into somewhat

Bryan Entzminger:

predictive math to say, you know, this client typically takes this

Bryan Entzminger:

long for this duration of audio.

Bryan Entzminger:

How long do these things that seemed like they would take?

Bryan Entzminger:

I just haven't figured out how to do that yet.

Daniel Abendroth:

Why am I not surprised that you track?

Daniel Abendroth:

Um,

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm a nerd.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I, that actually take you to enter that in because.

Bryan Entzminger:

I do it while it's mixing down.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

So, so I use a time tracker, that's built into my project management tool.

Bryan Entzminger:

So when I go to editing, I just hit the timer and say, I'm editing.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then when I finished editing the timer's done.

Bryan Entzminger:

When I move on to mix and master than, or T to mastering, then I just

Bryan Entzminger:

put that stuff in the spreadsheet.

Bryan Entzminger:

And the only thing that's left when I'm done is to track what

Bryan Entzminger:

was the final length of the audio?

Bryan Entzminger:

When did I finally deliver the thing?

Bryan Entzminger:

And how long did it take for the mastering?

Bryan Entzminger:

So in general, it doesn't take that much more time.

Bryan Entzminger:

It takes more time to zip an archive of the files and it does to track

Bryan Entzminger:

the, the administrative portion.

Bryan Entzminger:

But what happens when you're getting

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

interrupted?

Bryan Entzminger:

I kill people.

Bryan Entzminger:

No.

Bryan Entzminger:

So this is where I generally, we have an advantage over you because I

Bryan Entzminger:

edit between six and 7:00 AM when the kids are getting ready for school.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I edit typically between eight 30 and 10 30 at night, when the

Bryan Entzminger:

kids are supposed to be in bed.

Bryan Entzminger:

And generally I don't have a lot of interruptions.

Bryan Entzminger:

And if I do, I just pause the timer.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Well, are you using it?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

And so

Bryan Entzminger:

I use click up for tax task management and it

Bryan Entzminger:

has a built-in timer if you pay for the paid version, which I do.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so I just start the timer on the task that I'm working on.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then when I'm done, I just drop the little, I dropped the time

Bryan Entzminger:

information into a Google sheet.

Bryan Entzminger:

So you want to, so let's go with the Tim Ferriss thing, right?

Bryan Entzminger:

If there's something that needs to happen, eliminate what doesn't need to

Bryan Entzminger:

happen, automate what you can delegate.

Bryan Entzminger:

What's not important for you to do.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then you only do the rest, right?

Bryan Entzminger:

So for clients, I have as much set up to automate through Zapier or whatever.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I have a client that uses Trello as soon as she drops a card on the,

Bryan Entzminger:

the thing that says this is for Brian to do it creates a task for

Bryan Entzminger:

me and clip, click up and it creates a record for me in Google sheets.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so then between those two, I can use, click up to track the stuff.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then Google sheets is where I then, uh, archive the information.

Bryan Entzminger:

Is that right?

Bryan Entzminger:

Yes.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

But speaking of time management and things that need to be done, I think

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

that you should release like, uh, or sell all these spreadsheets you

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

talk about, because I couldn't even begin to imagine how to make them.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

I mean, sadly, it's nothing special, but, um, maybe

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I think it's very special.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Okay.

Daniel Abendroth:

I am not, it's not special to you

Daniel Abendroth:

because you take the knowledge

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

you are.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Uh, we, we, we are, uh, not spreadsheet gifted, like you are.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And then Kareem says I stopped using click up because of the unbearable starting

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

loading times it happened randomly.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Okay.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

But let's talk about that for a second, because I mean, he's talking

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

about click up in this particular instance, but what are those predict

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

productivity like time management killers?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So I'm thinking like when I was dealing with the latest windows update, right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It was absolutely horrible because my sound would go out every,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

every five minutes or every time I put a plugin in audition,

Bryan Entzminger:

I think probably the worst time management killer

Bryan Entzminger:

for me is when a client decides they want to reorder their episodes.

Bryan Entzminger:

Oh, they want to insert something in.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I have a client who's typically a couple of months ahead and every

Bryan Entzminger:

once in a while, he'll want to drop an, an episode mid cycle, right?

Bryan Entzminger:

So it's not just, it's not necessarily change the dates,

Bryan Entzminger:

although it could be, but it's also like re reordering everything.

Bryan Entzminger:

And because I have tracking and click up and tracking in Google

Bryan Entzminger:

sheets, and then I also have the project folders on my computer.

Bryan Entzminger:

I have to go back through and make sure that everything is renamed

Bryan Entzminger:

properly, or there's about an a hundred percent chance I'll be editing

Bryan Entzminger:

the wrong thing at the wrong time.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cause the, I set the system up so that as long as I do a little bit of management

Bryan Entzminger:

of the system, the system can manage me.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I know that I'm on episode 52 because that's what's click, click up says, so

Bryan Entzminger:

I go to folder for episode number 52, all the files are there and ready to go

Bryan Entzminger:

because they've just been sitting there, hanging out, waiting for me to work.

Bryan Entzminger:

If I don't keep that stuff aligned.

Bryan Entzminger:

I mean, that's like easy 30 to 45 minutes to reorder stuff and make

Bryan Entzminger:

sure that it all stays in order.

Bryan Entzminger:

And that's, that's where my system breaks down.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

Is when, when something's in there and it has to be updated.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I don't have a fix for that because it's not all sync there's, I don't know

Bryan Entzminger:

of a way to update a task and click up and have it update a specific record in

Bryan Entzminger:

Google sheets, because there's nothing in Zapier or any other tool that says, this

Bryan Entzminger:

is the one that you need to monkey with.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

It can create a new one, but it doesn't know what to do with the other stuff.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

What about you, Daniel?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

What's your,

Daniel Abendroth:

it used to be.

Daniel Abendroth:

The interruptions.

Daniel Abendroth:

So my wife and I worked together, like I mentioned earlier, and if she had a

Daniel Abendroth:

question about something by a client or whatever, she would just like ask me.

Daniel Abendroth:

And like you were saying earlier care, whenever you get those

Daniel Abendroth:

interruptions, that's like 30 minutes to get back on track.

Daniel Abendroth:

So we actually it's the most ridiculous thing, but we

Daniel Abendroth:

started using slack together.

Daniel Abendroth:

So like, like this is my desk, she's literally three feet over there.

Daniel Abendroth:

We just high-five and we'll be slacking each other back and forth.

Daniel Abendroth:

That way she can send me, ask me the questions and I can get to it whenever

Daniel Abendroth:

I have the time to devote to them.

Daniel Abendroth:

I,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I, my husband does, you know, he helps me, but he

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

doesn't do well with new technology.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Um, and I, cause I tried slack and that's kinda what I was hoping for it,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

but that didn't quite work out that way.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So, you know, kudos to you.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

And the other thing for me is burnout.

Daniel Abendroth:

Uh, so like I don't have kids and I work with my wife.

Daniel Abendroth:

So there's the work-life balance.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like doesn't exist because I don't really have a separate life outside of work

Daniel Abendroth:

because my family is part of my work.

Daniel Abendroth:

And so it's easy for me to just get sucked into work all day, every day and

Daniel Abendroth:

not take time for like, just for myself.

Daniel Abendroth:

So that's, for me, it's like in the middle of the day, it's just like, I get

Daniel Abendroth:

caught up, like watching a video or doing something else because like, I just can't

Daniel Abendroth:

like mentally focus on the task at hand.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

I think that's important, right?

Bryan Entzminger:

To plan in some kind of breaks.

Bryan Entzminger:

If you, if you worked in an office or on a production line,

Bryan Entzminger:

there are built in breaks.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah, you can't focus for eight hours straight on the same thing.

Bryan Entzminger:

Like say you worked at a bomb factory, right?

Bryan Entzminger:

Like the worst idea is to have somebody working 12 hour, four twelves at a

Bryan Entzminger:

bomb factory and not having a break because somebody's going to die.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

You're going to lose focus.

Bryan Entzminger:

Thankfully.

Bryan Entzminger:

It's nothing that critical for us, but yeah, it's a, it's a big deal,

Daniel Abendroth:

super consistent about it, but I try very hard to

Daniel Abendroth:

make sure I take off every Friday.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like no work, no nothing.

Daniel Abendroth:

I just do what I want to do.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

That I, even though I'm not so well organized, I will plan if I know

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

that, um, a client's gonna be late or something's gonna need to be done on the

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

weekend, then I'll take a weekday off.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Like today I did a couple of hours of work and then.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

You know, play or call of duty because that's my new thing.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And then I showed up here, right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Because I know that there are things I'm going to need to be doing on Saturday.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I have like coaching on, I, you know, I do coaching on

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

the weekends and you know, so I make sure that I have that time.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Um, because that avoid, if you work seven days a week for like,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I dunno, seven days or 14 days, you're just going to hate your job.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

You're going to hate what you do.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And you're just going to want to hide from it because that

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

doesn't help you make money.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It doesn't help you feel good about anything.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So it doesn't help your health.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It doesn't help you.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So I think that burnout thing is really important to like, And taking breaks.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

To make sure that you have, um, some self-care going on, not even just

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

with your family, but with yourself.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Get out, go take a walk, go outside to the flowers, go outside.

Daniel Abendroth:

And that was it position I was in, it was like seven days a week

Daniel Abendroth:

for months and being self-employed, you know, I set my own schedule so I

Daniel Abendroth:

can take, like, if I want to take a three hour lunch and just kind of like

Daniel Abendroth:

chill and watch YouTube for a while.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like I can.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I was kind of getting through by just taking like a little bit of

Daniel Abendroth:

time throughout the day and like late at night I would do my own thing.

Daniel Abendroth:

But yeah, I can only do that.

Daniel Abendroth:

I feel guilty

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

about taking breaks.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

So I'm curious if

Daniel Abendroth:

you guys absolutely taking an entire day

Daniel Abendroth:

off preposterous is very painful.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Because.

Daniel Abendroth:

And like our strategic about it.

Daniel Abendroth:

So like I take Fridays off because no shows of mine release on Friday.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I don't have to worry about like checking to make sure

Daniel Abendroth:

everything released correctly.

Daniel Abendroth:

I don't have any issues that way.

Daniel Abendroth:

And nothing happens on Saturday and Sunday.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I don't have to worry about like, I'm not struggling to meet a deadline.

Daniel Abendroth:

So Friday is like the perfect day to take off.

Daniel Abendroth:

But even still it's.

Daniel Abendroth:

I'm doing this thing for myself, but I could be working ahead on these

Daniel Abendroth:

shows that are coming out next week.

Daniel Abendroth:

I could be fixing issues on my website.

Daniel Abendroth:

I could be doing this, this and this.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like, it's really hard.

Daniel Abendroth:

And especially whenever like emails don't stop just because you take a day off.

Daniel Abendroth:

But,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

so, okay.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

But that's another great question because those boundaries, um, what

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I find is like, I am not wanting when I'm like taking time off.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I do not want my phone near me.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

That's not great for like my family, um, because I don't get their like messages

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

or phone calls, but because I see those emails coming in the notifications and I

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

don't know how to use my iPhone very well.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I'm going to need some late, but I get, I just, I get like sucked back in so easily.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So what do y'all do for that?

Bryan Entzminger:

I mean, one thing that gets me in trouble is my phone spends

Bryan Entzminger:

about, uh, about 99.7% of its time in, on vibrate and not always near me.

Bryan Entzminger:

And that gets me in trouble when my wife texts me.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I don't answer because I didn't hear it vibrate.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, but also, and then also I've turned off a lot of the notifications

Bryan Entzminger:

that would normally interrupt you.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I don't get email notifications on my phone.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't get Facebook messenger notifications on my phone.

Bryan Entzminger:

I get some of the normal annoyances that come through because it like some of the

Bryan Entzminger:

apps won't let you turn one thing off.

Bryan Entzminger:

You have to turn the whole thing off.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so, because of one value added haptic, I have to leave all the crap on.

Bryan Entzminger:

Thank you Twitter.

Bryan Entzminger:

But, but that stuff not withstanding.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's one thing is I just, I leave it on vibrate and then if

Bryan Entzminger:

I really need to focus, I may put it in do not disturb mode.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't really like the whole power it off power backup thing.

Bryan Entzminger:

That for me is just a pain in the can.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, I don't know.

Bryan Entzminger:

What about you, Daniel?

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, I don't know if this is the right answer, but

Daniel Abendroth:

I've just because sometimes there are fires to put out on my day off and I

Daniel Abendroth:

do want to like still be connected.

Daniel Abendroth:

So if like a client comes back saying like, Hey, there's

Daniel Abendroth:

an issue with this episode.

Daniel Abendroth:

Part of my customer service, I like the value I offer to my clients is like

Daniel Abendroth:

being able to take care of those things.

Daniel Abendroth:

I do keep my phone and keep my emails, but I feel like I've gotten

Daniel Abendroth:

better was that you have a VA, right?

Daniel Abendroth:

I do, because she doesn't handle that kind of thing.

Daniel Abendroth:

I haven't gotten to the point where I can trust a third party

Daniel Abendroth:

with the login credentials to my clients, like share via host.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I thought I'd take care of all that.

Daniel Abendroth:

I

Bryan Entzminger:

guess I was thinking like, if you could have your VA as is

Bryan Entzminger:

male or female, I don't know female.

Bryan Entzminger:

Okay.

Bryan Entzminger:

Is her, I just wanted to use the right pronoun.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, so if, if she could take those communications and pass on to you,

Bryan Entzminger:

the things that are urgent based on like issue with the client's episode,

Bryan Entzminger:

something like that, and have her be that contact, then maybe you don't

Bryan Entzminger:

have to have your phone available.

Bryan Entzminger:

You could have a way set up for her to contact you if it's critical.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, the issue with that would be I don't set her hours because

Daniel Abendroth:

she is a contractor mainly like she works.

Daniel Abendroth:

Before me in the day.

Daniel Abendroth:

So that way, like she can verify, um, so she checks like all my episodes,

Daniel Abendroth:

like I scheduled for release in the morning, she listens through and check,

Daniel Abendroth:

make sure I didn't leave a long pause.

Daniel Abendroth:

There's any kind of just like quality, final quality check.

Daniel Abendroth:

And she does that before I start my day.

Daniel Abendroth:

So that way whenever I get going, and then she also goes through my email and

Daniel Abendroth:

like source through what's important.

Daniel Abendroth:

What's not.

Daniel Abendroth:

So like she works early in the morning and wouldn't, isn't

Daniel Abendroth:

always around later in the day.

Daniel Abendroth:

Gotcha.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

And she's not like on call.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah, well, that's one of the things my

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

husband does is, um, he'll check.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

He gets up, oh, so early in the morning earlier than Brian.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And so he will check the inbox and if there's something important, he will

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

wake me up and I will deal with it.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

But, um, Kareem says during work, I turn off all phone notifications and only

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

check my email once every two hours or so.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I try to, okay.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So I honestly don't know I've turned my notifications off and I don't know how

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

to make my phone make sound again for any kind of alert except for the alarms.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I do not know what I'm doing.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So it's, it's always wrong.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It's never, you know, a sound when I want it and no sound when I don't want it.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Also, I have started besides my husband checking emails.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So I will check my email, like at the beginning of my day before lunch.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And then at the end of the day, because it's so distracting because

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

we're when we're flipping time, we're constantly transitioning from

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

tasks to tasks as entrepreneur.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And it really does take you a while to like, shift your focus like that.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Like,

Bryan Entzminger:

yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

And that's, that's a definite hack.

Bryan Entzminger:

So when I, when I say I get up and I work from six to seven,

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't have my email open.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

And it's not.

Bryan Entzminger:

And, and honestly it's become such a habit now that I don't

Bryan Entzminger:

even think about it early on.

Bryan Entzminger:

I had to remember not to do that, but once you get used to it, like, it can

Bryan Entzminger:

be really nice to get that first hour ish in and have that part knocked out.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, I think one of the things that we're kind of talking around and

Bryan Entzminger:

maybe just haven't said expressly.

Bryan Entzminger:

As a business owner, as an entrepreneur, it can feel like

Bryan Entzminger:

everybody's in charge of your time.

Bryan Entzminger:

And there's always somebody wanting to sell you something else that you can do

Bryan Entzminger:

for them or that they can help you do for like, there's always another opportunity.

Bryan Entzminger:

The job, a big part of the job is deciding how big a playing field you

Bryan Entzminger:

want to have, and then figuring out how to fit the game onto that field.

Bryan Entzminger:

If that makes sense, I'm using a sport and sports analogy, because I hear understand

Bryan Entzminger:

other people understand sports things.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I'm S I'm assuming like fo uh, football, either American or European

Bryan Entzminger:

football, the other, the rest of the world's football, the field is a

Bryan Entzminger:

certain size and everybody, every part of the game has to fit on that field

Bryan Entzminger:

or something is called out of bounds.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I think as business owners, it's our job to decide how big our field is.

Bryan Entzminger:

So in my case, right now, my field is three hours a day in some time on

Bryan Entzminger:

Saturday, that's the size of the field.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so everything has to fit on that or something has to go or

Bryan Entzminger:

has to be delegated, or like some, something has to go off my plate

Bryan Entzminger:

because my field is only that big.

Bryan Entzminger:

I can't take time for my daytime employer.

Bryan Entzminger:

My business, because not only would they get really upset, but that's kind

Bryan Entzminger:

of a crappy way to treat my employer.

Bryan Entzminger:

Who's making this all possible.

Bryan Entzminger:

Just quit.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's awesome.

Bryan Entzminger:

Thank you.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Uh, football editing.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Uh, okay, so Daniel, I think you had something you wanted to share or bring

Daniel Abendroth:

up.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah, kind of in that vein, it's something you mentioned earlier, Brian

Daniel Abendroth:

was just the thought I had about that is being conscious of what your capacity

Daniel Abendroth:

is and making arrangements beforehand.

Daniel Abendroth:

So like right now, like I'm looking to hire a couple editors because

Daniel Abendroth:

like I've reached my capacity.

Daniel Abendroth:

The problem with that is I'm at my capacity and the process of

Daniel Abendroth:

finding contractors takes time.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

So there's that struggle.

Daniel Abendroth:

So, and Carrie mentioned wanting to get her automations in place and

Daniel Abendroth:

Brian, you have wonderful automations.

Daniel Abendroth:

It's just like having all your systems in place as you're building, when you

Daniel Abendroth:

still, before we reached capacity, because once you reach capacity.

Daniel Abendroth:

Oh, it's so hard.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Trying to find a contractor, trying to build a system that they can fit

Daniel Abendroth:

into all while you're at capacity.

Daniel Abendroth:

So just like, be aware and make arrangements like

Daniel Abendroth:

before you get to that point.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Oh, go ahead.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

You know, if you are just starting out, please, you know, set this up first or

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

start talking, thinking about this first, before you start getting all your clients,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

like if you can start at zero and kind of think through these systems and this

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

time management thing, because doing it in hindsight and backtracking is tough.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I mean, like hiring contractors, you know, I said, I'm getting my systems in place.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Well, I hired somebody to get my systems in place and it's even hard to like manage

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

that piece and being able to like check up on the work he's done because everything,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

you know, occasionally just gets crazy.

Bryan Entzminger:

I think.

Bryan Entzminger:

So this is something that I've done in the past, in my work

Bryan Entzminger:

life, as well as my business.

Bryan Entzminger:

Because I have found myself at capacity and still needing to do more.

Bryan Entzminger:

And in those instances, I feel like there's like three things you,

Bryan Entzminger:

well, four things you can do, right?

Bryan Entzminger:

One is you can just not do something.

Bryan Entzminger:

Another is, you can just try and push through, but if you really

Bryan Entzminger:

want to make a change, you either try and find the highest leverage

Bryan Entzminger:

thing to make progress on.

Bryan Entzminger:

So in your case, getting your business systems in place or whatever, or.

Bryan Entzminger:

Finding the one thing that will deliver you a little bit of time every day,

Bryan Entzminger:

that doesn't take long to knock out.

Bryan Entzminger:

And my, my recommendation is actually to do the one little thing a day.

Bryan Entzminger:

So maybe you can't automate your entire thing, but there's a portion

Bryan Entzminger:

that you can automate, or there's a portion that you can pass off.

Bryan Entzminger:

Maybe you don't have time to bring in a full VA, but your spouse or a kid or

Bryan Entzminger:

a friend can help you with some portion of that, get that five or 10 or 15

Bryan Entzminger:

minutes back a day and use that time to then move on to the next biggest thing.

Bryan Entzminger:

Because what you'll find is that ultimately you can snowball that to

Bryan Entzminger:

where at some point you're able to start tackling those bigger things.

Bryan Entzminger:

But if you've got like, Carrie's got this thing where she had to hire

Bryan Entzminger:

somebody to come in and set up those systems, if she couldn't hire somebody,

Bryan Entzminger:

this could be a month or a year long.

Bryan Entzminger:

Thing trying to get that in place all the while she's still floundering,

Bryan Entzminger:

you know, trying to, trying to tread water and get all this stuff set up.

Bryan Entzminger:

So like, if you can't, if you can't bring somebody in, find a way to do something

Bryan Entzminger:

small and get that something small off.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah, I think the baby steps really do add up.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Um, in, in anything you do.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So like with Instagram, for Daniel, one story a week, you know, I feel

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

like if Instagram envy, because he brought it up a couple of times, but

Bryan Entzminger:

Daniel, let me go a

Daniel Abendroth:

little bit.

Daniel Abendroth:

And it also doesn't help that we're like, we've been in the process of rebranding.

Daniel Abendroth:

And so like, it doesn't make sense to like post on Instagram, like everything's

Daniel Abendroth:

going to change at some point.

Daniel Abendroth:

Right?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And that, and that at least back to the, kind of the seen other people do it.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And that's the other thing is, is giving yourself some grace, because we are

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

juggling so many things and everybody has different priorities, right?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I mean, there's some people like they only want like two editing clients, but

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

they want to like do all these courses.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Or they want to work on some of them.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Business type things for, you know, whatever.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I don't know what people do.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Honestly.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I don't have a lot of time to pay attention these days.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Um, but like everybody's priorities, everybody's goals are different.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I think that not comparing yourself and just giving yourself

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

some grace to just, you know, if you get overwhelmed, just go watch some

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Netflix for a little while appeal.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

All right.

Daniel Abendroth:

And that's kind of like, what I've learned is

Daniel Abendroth:

like, Instagram is not for me.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like Facebook ads are not for me.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like these other things.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like, they're just not for me.

Daniel Abendroth:

And I don't need to put my hand in everything just because

Daniel Abendroth:

somebody else's doing it

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

and it's good to let other people.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Oh at what they're great at too, you know, I, you know, sometimes I'm like, I

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

tell myself, thank goodness they're doing that because I don't have time for it.

Bryan Entzminger:

Touch on Kareem's question.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cause I think it just kind of keyed into what you were talking about.

Bryan Entzminger:

Kareem asks, is it easy to transfer your editing style

Bryan Entzminger:

to new subcontracted editors?

Bryan Entzminger:

And I think we've all got, I think at this point, some experience with

Bryan Entzminger:

that, my experience, the subcontractor, the editor that I've worked with.

Bryan Entzminger:

I started talking to him, partly because we had both been through Chris

Bryan Entzminger:

Curran's podcast engineering school.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so now I knew that he had a similar foundation in terms of

Bryan Entzminger:

the approach to audio processing.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then the way I talked with him about it was we went through a

Bryan Entzminger:

couple of rounds where I would say, okay, here's what I'm looking for.

Bryan Entzminger:

Send me back and then I'll send you revisions.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right?

Bryan Entzminger:

And so it took a couple of passes the first couple of times until he got an

Bryan Entzminger:

understanding, because it's really easy to say, I want you to cut 85 to 90% of

Bryan Entzminger:

the ums and leave in the breasts, but shorten the silences, but not too much,

Bryan Entzminger:

like that starts to get really weird.

Bryan Entzminger:

But as you start doing it and you stop me coming back and saying,

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm sorry, you got this wrong.

Bryan Entzminger:

It's me saying, I probably didn't explain this well, or this is what I meant.

Bryan Entzminger:

And that, you know, you start to develop a field because it isn't easy

Bryan Entzminger:

to say this is specifically what I do.

Bryan Entzminger:

What, what about you guys?

Bryan Entzminger:

I

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

would say in a lot of ways, no, it's not.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right because everybody, you know, unless you are in a situation where

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

you're learning together or you've been trained to do it the same way, I

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

think everybody has a different style.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

They have a different ear.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And there's actually a lot of conversation that has to go on

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

about how you like things done, how your clients, like things done.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Cause even that's an added layer because your clients have their own style.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And then it is, I think it's just a process, you know, managing

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

people is also time-consuming.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So there's actually, it does make your life easier and then went wrong long run.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

But there is work that goes along with contracting out people.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So I wouldn't say it was easy.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I'd say it's helpful, but not how about

Daniel Abendroth:

you Daniel?

Daniel Abendroth:

I would say I haven't actually hired a editor yet,

Bryan Entzminger:

but, but you've interviewed some people, right.

Bryan Entzminger:

Or at least talk to some people have

Daniel Abendroth:

started the process.

Daniel Abendroth:

I've got an applicant.

Daniel Abendroth:

And then I haven't had the time or bandwidth to move forward too much with

Bryan Entzminger:

that.

Bryan Entzminger:

Okay.

Bryan Entzminger:

Well go ahead, Carrie,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

add that, like when you find those right people,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

it's a wonderful, wonderful thing.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Like I trust my, my editors with everything.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I know they'll ask questions.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I know they'll give good feedback.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

You know, I know they're gonna, you know, get things done, be timely, be dependent.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Like that's amazing where I can just be like, I know Ella Honduras, you

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

know, I don't have to worry about this because Alejandro has got it.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I can take the day off because Alejandro and my, you know, so yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It's absolutely wonderful.

Daniel Abendroth:

Thank you for chiming in Jennifer.

Daniel Abendroth:

Who's saying I'm too busy to keep up, but too lazy to manage other people.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It is some work.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It is some work.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It is,

Daniel Abendroth:

but that's also a point going back to what your capacity is.

Daniel Abendroth:

Just keeping in mind that before you reach your capacity, not like hiring

Daniel Abendroth:

an editor is great to take it out, load off your plate, but you're adding more

Daniel Abendroth:

to your plate while you bring while they go through the onboarding process.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

And I guess I'll kind of recall back to our episode with Brittany, Felix.

Daniel Abendroth:

I don't remember which episode number it was.

Daniel Abendroth:

Uh, but she talked about like her process of, she will like get on a call, like

Daniel Abendroth:

on a video chat or so I think so, and like edit with her new contractor so

Daniel Abendroth:

the contractor can see her process.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

That's actually, yeah, I remember that.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

That's really smart.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I don't remember

Bryan Entzminger:

that one.

Bryan Entzminger:

That is, that is good.

Daniel Abendroth:

Well, it's Brittany, Felix.

Daniel Abendroth:

I think she mentioned on this show.

Daniel Abendroth:

Somewhere else, like, no, it was,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I remember, well, I'm going to hope it was

Daniel Abendroth:

our chest.

Daniel Abendroth:

She, no matter what she's on, she's always dropping gyms.

Daniel Abendroth:

So it's hard to keep them all.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

We just need to put her in a bottle.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Uh, so Kareem says that his experience has been with graphics and illustrations

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

and he wasn't even able to start to subcontract his own style.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I think that's true of any client work.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

You always got to follow the boss's style,

Daniel Abendroth:

even when they're wrong, but also keep in mind that

Daniel Abendroth:

there's not one way to do anything.

Daniel Abendroth:

And just because like a subcontractor isn't doing it the

Daniel Abendroth:

same, exactly what you would do.

Daniel Abendroth:

It doesn't mean that it's wrong or inferior.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I would add to that.

Bryan Entzminger:

I think there's, it's a little bit different with editing somebody else's

Bryan Entzminger:

content as opposed to creating your own.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

So.

Bryan Entzminger:

The way I understand graphic design is I'm starting with a, maybe a design

Bryan Entzminger:

brief or something, and I've got to create something out of nothing it's

Bryan Entzminger:

different too, to approach the editing portion and say, so if you think about

Bryan Entzminger:

like developing film or something, there are different ways you can develop

Bryan Entzminger:

film, but the photos already been taken.

Bryan Entzminger:

It's just a matter of drawing out what you want.

Bryan Entzminger:

And there is definitely a creative process to that, but it's not like trying to

Bryan Entzminger:

create something literally out of nothing.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I think there's probably a little bit more can't think of the

Bryan Entzminger:

word grace that goes with that.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right?

Bryan Entzminger:

So it doesn't have to be, it's a little, it's a little bit different in my mind.

Bryan Entzminger:

Maybe I'm wrong.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't know.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I feel like this whole business requires a lot

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

of grace and a lot of prayers now.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I'm, I'm, I'm being silly just cause I've been, yeah, this, this episode is very

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

timely for me because I have been having.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

A lot of time management issues, for whatever reasons the, I find I'm finding

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

this personally helpful and enlightening.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Awesome.

Bryan Entzminger:

So you're coming off of a year of really intense

Bryan Entzminger:

learning and trying not to take on new business to now building business.

Bryan Entzminger:

And it's a challenge to keep everything.

Bryan Entzminger:

Rolling.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yes.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And I don't know, I, I went to my mother's last week or the

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

week before and everything had been in the business had been nice and calm and

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

going steady and, you know, even keel.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And so I didn't like make a big deal.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I was like, oh, is this working while I'm there?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Every, I swear, every single client, everybody who's ever worked with me in

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

the past sent me an email that week.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It's like, the universe was like, oh, she's ready.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And, um, just went boom.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And then I was, you know, started redesigning my systems and

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

all, you know, so much stuff.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Now I'm just like, okay, all right, I'm good.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I'm good.

Bryan Entzminger:

You bring up a good thought exercise, right?

Bryan Entzminger:

If you think through your typical work week, if you were

Bryan Entzminger:

to try and take some time off.

Bryan Entzminger:

What are the things that would need to continue to have attention or have the

Bryan Entzminger:

probability to break while you're, and maybe this is a topic for a new episode.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't know.

Bryan Entzminger:

What are the things that have a probability to break or to need

Bryan Entzminger:

attention if you were to take a day or a week or a month off, because

Bryan Entzminger:

then those become the things that long-term you need to think about.

Bryan Entzminger:

Okay.

Bryan Entzminger:

How can I build that out so that it doesn't depend on me and

Bryan Entzminger:

this again, is thinking like, I want to be the business owner.

Bryan Entzminger:

Not saying I don't want to work in the business.

Bryan Entzminger:

I still do.

Bryan Entzminger:

But like, if, if I was a doctor and I have a practice of one, if I'm

Bryan Entzminger:

out the whole practice shuts down.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yes.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And some doctors are like, which is highly inconvenient.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It is, that is a fabulous, um, thought exercise.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I had never really thought about it before.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Definitely somebody simply to watch the email that just, it just has to be done.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And then.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Having that team of editors in case something does come up,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

something needs to be revised.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I can throw it to them and be like, you know, oh, can you fix this?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And then having, um, somebody just inspect for quality.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So it just makes it easier.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So things don't come back.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And then billing, right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Billing takes up a lot of time for me.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Um, which is not a bad problem, but making sure that the invoices

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

go out in a timely manner

Bryan Entzminger:

and that they're right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

And that they're right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Yes.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

So the last thing you want to do is have an incorrect invoice that is, yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

Not fun in business.

Bryan Entzminger:

There's two things you don't mess with.

Bryan Entzminger:

People's time off and people's money.

Bryan Entzminger:

Those are the things you don't want.

Bryan Entzminger:

Well, I feel like we're getting down to the end, so we should probably hit

Bryan Entzminger:

the pod decks question of the day.

Bryan Entzminger:

Are you guys all right with that?

Daniel Abendroth:

Of course.

Bryan Entzminger:

Okay.

Bryan Entzminger:

So for those of you, yeah, in the chat, we'd like to have your answers as well.

Bryan Entzminger:

If you're listening to the replay, we'd love to have you

Bryan Entzminger:

stop by and give your answer.

Bryan Entzminger:

This is a pod deck that I just chose randomly out of the deck of pod deck and

Bryan Entzminger:

it's, and I'm going to alter it just a tiny bit to make it podcast relevant.

Bryan Entzminger:

What's something about podcasting that people are obsessed with, but you

Bryan Entzminger:

don't, you just don't get the point of, so what's something about podcasting

Bryan Entzminger:

that people are obsessed with, that you just don't get the point of.

Bryan Entzminger:

And it's a hard one for me, because I can, like, there are things,

Bryan Entzminger:

people are obsessed with that.

Bryan Entzminger:

I kind of get the point of, even though I don't think they're valuable.

Bryan Entzminger:

So like ratings and reviews, they're actually not that

Bryan Entzminger:

important, but I kind of liked them.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I kind of get it.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, I dunno what, uh, I'll ask you guys.

Bryan Entzminger:

What, what are things about podcasting that people are

Bryan Entzminger:

obsessed that you just don't know?

Daniel Abendroth:

The obsession with how long an episode needs to be.

Daniel Abendroth:

Ooh.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah, because people like are really concerned to make sure they have like

Daniel Abendroth:

the right length and the answer is like, it depends on so many different things.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like, and there is no right answer.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Kareem set the base and I would, I would kind

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

of agree with that because I feel like everybody wants to be more

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

warm and Boomi, but you know what?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

That's not how it

Bryan Entzminger:

sounds.

Bryan Entzminger:

No, I actually, I want to be less warm and boomy, especially when I've

Bryan Entzminger:

got nasal things going on like today.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And like, if I'm competing against, you know, the wind through my car window too,

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

that's going to make you harder to hear.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I would say money and sponsorships and advertising and, um, you know, all those

Daniel Abendroth:

things.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

If you're on episode five, you probably don't need to worry about monetizing

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

yeah.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Or download numbers.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I think that kind of goes hand in hand.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Um, but yeah, 99% of people don't make money podcasting.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Right.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So, and they just never will.

Bryan Entzminger:

And if you're, if you're going to start worrying about

Bryan Entzminger:

sponsorships by episode five, you really need to start worrying about

Bryan Entzminger:

that before episode one, because you need to design your show for that.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, that that's my view on that.

Bryan Entzminger:

I will, I will take the obsession with.

Bryan Entzminger:

If I change podcast hosts, will my downloads increase?

Bryan Entzminger:

That's a weird

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

question

Bryan Entzminger:

because I've seen people

Daniel Abendroth:

like, well, well, that's not entirely true.

Daniel Abendroth:

If you switch to SoundCloud, chances are your downloads are

Daniel Abendroth:

going to drastically increase.

Daniel Abendroth:

Well, not real down stats numbers.

Bryan Entzminger:

All right.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cool.

Bryan Entzminger:

Well, that's, that's a, that's a fun one.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah, we'll go ahead and draw it to a close for those

Bryan Entzminger:

of you that joined us live.

Bryan Entzminger:

Thank you for your comments and for being here.

Bryan Entzminger:

Daniel, do you want to tell everybody how to be a guest

Daniel Abendroth:

do is go to podcast editors, mastermind.com/b guests, fill

Daniel Abendroth:

out the form and then we'll be in touch.

Daniel Abendroth:

We do have a number in the queue right now.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I will, if you have submitted, um, just be patient, we are getting to them.

Daniel Abendroth:

And now that I've realized to look at my spam folder, so we do, and we actually

Daniel Abendroth:

had some really cool plans coming up with the guests that we have in queue now.

Daniel Abendroth:

So be sure to subscribe and follow the page and do all the things

Daniel Abendroth:

because here's going to be really fun when it comes to the show.

Daniel Abendroth:

Really excited about it.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

We got

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

a lot of cool things planned,

Bryan Entzminger:

actually share a little bit more about sort of

Bryan Entzminger:

high level what we were thinking.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cause we, we were strategizing last week.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

Oh, do I want to share?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

:

No, I want them to guess,

Daniel Abendroth:

guess

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

yeah, no, we are going to focus on things

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

that y'all keep asking about.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And one of the things is how do I get clients?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Like where do I get clients?

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So we're going to do like a series of, of these topics that are going to help

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

you get clients, make money, whatever.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

I don't, I'm not saying this real well, all of a sudden, I

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

know Daniel wrote the plans down.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Maybe he should

Daniel Abendroth:

write them down.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Oh, okay.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So, but we are going to help you get clients.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

We're going to help you with the marketing piece.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

We're going to have a seasoned editor on.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And a new editor on to kind of workshop them through these things too, so

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

that I'm really looking forward

Bryan Entzminger:

to.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

I've got a couple of ideas that I thought about today that I'll share with the two

Bryan Entzminger:

of you the next time we get together.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cause I think they might be some really cool ways that we can take this show

Bryan Entzminger:

and, and make it even more valuable and to serve people more deeply.

Bryan Entzminger:

So more to come on that.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cause I haven't talked to the other Yeti, so I'm not going to say anything

Bryan Entzminger:

publicly, cause I'm not that dumb.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

So Brian is vague podcasting right now.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

We apologize for

Bryan Entzminger:

it.

Bryan Entzminger:

I heard from Eric K.

Bryan Entzminger:

Johnson that you're supposed to tease the next topic.

Bryan Entzminger:

And while this isn't the next topic, I think we've got some good stuff anyway.

Bryan Entzminger:

Well we'll let that one go discussion about how to balance your life

Bryan Entzminger:

with your podcast production.

Bryan Entzminger:

If you haven't noticed, we've definitely got it all figured out

Bryan Entzminger:

or else we're still figuring it out.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I am Brian Ensminger.

Bryan Entzminger:

You can find me@toptieraudio.com beside me is.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Um, Carrie Caulfield, Eric, you can find

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

me@yayapodcasting.com or on Instagram at

Daniel Abendroth:

Carrie air I'm Daniel Abendroth.

Daniel Abendroth:

And you can find me@rothmedia.audio.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

And if you're oh, wait, I'm gonna say one more thing.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

If you are not a member of our Facebook group, come and join in.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Facebook.com/groups/podcast editors mastermind.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

Uh, there've been a lot of great conversations in there and you'll

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

get the skinny on what's happening and also subscribe to our newsletter.

Carrie Caulfield Arick:

It's found on our website podcast, editors, mastermind.com.

Bryan Entzminger:

So thanks everybody for being here.

Bryan Entzminger:

We appreciate you in the comments and also look forward to hearing

Bryan Entzminger:

from you more in the group.

About the author, Bryan Entzminger

Bryan Entzminger is the owner of Top Tier Audio, a podcast production company. He's also the founder of the Hindy Users (Unofficial) group for Hindenburg users on Facebook, and a co-host of Podcast Editors Mastermind — a podcast focused on the business side of podcast editing. He loves sharing the lessons he’s learned from his struggles and others he's met along the way so that you can have a podcast that you’re proud of without letting editing take over your life.

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