Transitioning To a Full Time Podcast Editor, with Stevie Manns

title image: transitioning to a full time podcast editor

Going full-time as a podcast editor is the dream, right? Working at the side-hustle until you reach the point that you can make it your full-time job. But what does that look like? How do you actually make that leap?

We're talking with Stevie Manns about this very topic. They are a podcast editor making that transition and leaving the corporate struggle behind.

Links & Resources

About Stevie Manns

Stevie started off in radio as a presenter more than a decade ago hosting a weekend breakfast show. They are also a musician and has spent years in the studio learning under some of the industry’s top producers. As a podcast producer and coach, Stevie works with entrepreneurs and small businesses, helping them create content that inspires and empowers. Stevie says “Nothing makes me happier than helping someone achieve their goals and help bring their message to the masses!”

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About the Podcast Editors Mastermind

The Podcast Editors Mastermind is for professional podcast editors who want to grow their business and get more clients. We’re creating a community of like-minded professionals that are passionate about the art and science of editing podcasts.

Our goal is to help you build your business by providing tools, resources, and support so you can focus on what matters most—your craft. This isn’t just another group where everyone talks about how great they are at podcast editing; we show our work!

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Transcript
Daniel Abendroth:

How much is that,

Daniel Abendroth:

um, um,

Daniel Abendroth:

welcome to the podcast.

Daniel Abendroth:

Editors mastermind, a podcast dedicated to the business side of podcast editing.

Daniel Abendroth:

Uh, today we have a really fun show is going over kind of the dream, right?

Daniel Abendroth:

So it's going full time as a podcast editor, and we have an amazing guest,

Daniel Abendroth:

uh, before getting into that, um, Daniel Abendroth, you can find me at

Daniel Abendroth:

Roth media audio and below me, we have,

Bryan Entzminger:

we have Brian Ensminger who's at top tier audio.com

Bryan Entzminger:

and apparently so happy to talk.

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm interrupting as Daniel's introducing me.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I don't know what's up with that.

Bryan Entzminger:

It feels like I'm just ready to go today.

Bryan Entzminger:

Daniel, I don't, I'm going to shut up now.

Bryan Entzminger:

It's your turn.

Stevie Manns:

Do you know?

Stevie Manns:

I'm sure I've spoken with you.

Stevie Manns:

The site in some sort of Facebook editor's group, I'm sure I have.

Stevie Manns:

Now I'm seeing your last thing.

Stevie Manns:

I'm like, oh, we connected.

Stevie Manns:

And like, you know, when you see someone's picture and then you

Stevie Manns:

see them a little tiny meeting.

Stevie Manns:

Oh, sorry.

Stevie Manns:

Hello.

Stevie Manns:

I'm CD mans brand new podcast edited to the, to the whole industry.

Stevie Manns:

So thank you very much for having me on

Daniel Abendroth:

Stevie started off in radio as a presenter more than a decade

Daniel Abendroth:

ago, hosting a weekend breakfast show.

Daniel Abendroth:

They're also a musician and has spent years in the studio learning under

Daniel Abendroth:

some of the industry's top producers as a podcast producer and coach DV

Daniel Abendroth:

works with entrepreneurs and small businesses, helping them create

Daniel Abendroth:

content that inspires and empowers.

Daniel Abendroth:

Stevie says nothing makes me happier than helping someone achieve their goals and

Daniel Abendroth:

help bring their message to the masses.

Daniel Abendroth:

Stevie, thank you so much for joining us tonight.

Stevie Manns:

I'm pleasure.

Stevie Manns:

And thank you for reading my bio.

Stevie Manns:

It sounds great.

Stevie Manns:

Oh,

Daniel Abendroth:

I'm sorry for screwing it up just easy.

Stevie Manns:

I love it.

Stevie Manns:

I love it.

Stevie Manns:

Do you know, it's just like, as a musician, like you write your bio

Stevie Manns:

for other people and I'm sure it translates into other industries.

Stevie Manns:

It's always really funny hearing it back, but it's that we sounded fun.

Stevie Manns:

Thanks.

Daniel Abendroth:

So tell us a little bit about like where you come

Daniel Abendroth:

from and how you got to the point.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I guess the big news is that you are now a full-time podcast editor.

Stevie Manns:

Okay.

Stevie Manns:

So as of more or less tomorrow, yes.

Stevie Manns:

So, um, I had have slash had a day job.

Stevie Manns:

So I have worked in the corporate field for 14 years.

Stevie Manns:

In fact, um, in the finance industry loved it, absolutely loved it.

Stevie Manns:that thing of, I graduated in:Stevie Manns:a job in banking and in:Stevie Manns:

And at that point I hadn't really figured out what I wanted to do.

Stevie Manns:

And it was just a case of, well, the economies.

Stevie Manns:

Can I swear on this?

Daniel Abendroth:

Uh, probably

Stevie Manns:

not, probably not the economy is not doing well.

Stevie Manns:

Um, and so I was like, okay, I should probably, you know, I'm good at math.

Stevie Manns:

I can do it.

Stevie Manns:

Let's just stick with it.

Stevie Manns:

And just never really lit my fire.

Stevie Manns:

And it was funny because last year, obviously during the pandemic,

Stevie Manns:

how many people can I get an amen had a come to Jesus moment.

Stevie Manns:

And I had one of those moments I was reading and forgive me, you, you

Stevie Manns:

gentlemen may not have read this book.

Stevie Manns:

I'm not going to say that you haven't, and I'm not making a make any assumptions.

Stevie Manns:

But I was reading Glenn and Doyle's book on tamed and in the book, she had

Stevie Manns:

a moment where she was speaking with a friend and she asked her friend,

Stevie Manns:

what is the most honest truest version that you can imagine of your life?

Stevie Manns:

And I just put the book down and I was like, well, it's not this.

Stevie Manns:

And at that point gave myself permission to go.

Stevie Manns:

If I had a blank piece of paper and I wanted to write, you

Stevie Manns:

know, to design my life and my career, what would it look like?

Stevie Manns:

And that was the first time I'd really given myself permission to do that.

Stevie Manns:

And at that point, um, I, you know, had, you know, a couple of my own

Stevie Manns:

podcasts, I was helping some friends with theirs and I thought this is

Stevie Manns:

something that I'm really interested in.

Stevie Manns:

I've been doing my own for a couple of years.

Stevie Manns:

I've been in audio.

Stevie Manns:

Um, my, my dad's actually in radio he's, he's, he's been radio for like

Stevie Manns:

40 years or something like that.

Stevie Manns:

So I, I'd always sort of grown up with it in the background.

Stevie Manns:

And, and for me, podcasting is the new radio and I thought, yeah, I love this.

Stevie Manns:

Why am I not doing this?

Stevie Manns:

What am I so scared of?

Stevie Manns:

How, you know, if I were to design a career in it, what would it look

Stevie Manns:

like and how would I get there?

Stevie Manns:

And that's when I really started thinking about.

Stevie Manns:

What do I need to do in order to make this happen?

Stevie Manns:

And tomorrow, you know, it isn't exactly the way I would have wanted to make

Stevie Manns:

it happen in the sense of, you know, I'm, I'm able to quit my corporate job.

Stevie Manns:

I'm kind of getting a payout from this job, um, which is great, but I'm

Stevie Manns:

now being, you know, it's a slightly different situation where, you know,

Stevie Manns:

hopefully a number of people will be able to kind of build up a portfolio of

Stevie Manns:

clients where they're able to support themselves and get, get to that position.

Stevie Manns:

I'm in a slightly different situation.

Stevie Manns:

I'm very fortunate to be able to sort of quit my day job and have a bit

Stevie Manns:

of a buffer and be able to do that.

Stevie Manns:

But that's kind of how it's happened for me.

Stevie Manns:

And I'm really grateful and I'm really happy that, you know, postmark, I

Stevie Manns:

say post pandemic, we are not post pandemic, but post the worst of the

Stevie Manns:

pandemic, I'm now able to look at a different life and career for myself.

Bryan Entzminger:

So roughly a year, since you read the book year a year and a half,

Stevie Manns:

I believe it was may last year.

Stevie Manns:

Yeah.

Stevie Manns:

And I think in June I secured my first.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's crazy.

Bryan Entzminger:

So, I mean from essentially zero to like ready to make the transition

Bryan Entzminger:

right now and right about a year.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's incredible.

Bryan Entzminger:

What did you like, how did you start laying that groundwork and building that

Bryan Entzminger:

framework to, to build your path to this?

Bryan Entzminger:

I

Stevie Manns:

think the first place I started, I mean, you could say that I,

Stevie Manns:

in terms of getting my first client, that was the first step, but it isn't,

Stevie Manns:

I think the first step is having the interest, developing your skillset.

Stevie Manns:

And I was doing.

Stevie Manns:

Oh, I had been doing that with my own podcasts.

Stevie Manns:

Um, and I have, you know, my primary podcast is, um, is a music interview show.

Stevie Manns:

I'm a musician and that's sort of what I started doing.

Stevie Manns:

And when I was working in radio, one of the ideas that I had, you know, as

Stevie Manns:

a musician and a radio presenter was, I want to interview local musicians.

Stevie Manns:

I want to do a quick 10 minute segment, ask them about a song of theirs and

Stevie Manns:

put a deck on, on the radio and promote local, local music and local musicians.

Stevie Manns:

I was actually living in, um, on, on a small island called

Stevie Manns:

Josie, Josie OJI, as I call it.

Stevie Manns:

Cause it's the original in the channel islands in the

Stevie Manns:

UK, or sorry in great Britain.

Stevie Manns:

It's not actually part of the UK.

Stevie Manns:

And, um, I really wanted to promote the local music scene because it's

Stevie Manns:

just a really small, you know, it's a small island and it had to have

Stevie Manns:

that sort of small town feel to it.

Stevie Manns:

And what I did was I had to sell this idea the only way that I was able to get.

Stevie Manns:

On the radio was to sell this as a segment and give it to the sales

Stevie Manns:

team and have someone sponsor it.

Stevie Manns:

So that was sort of my first idea of this is sort of, it was sort

Stevie Manns:

of a mini show and I had to, you know, sell it to the radio station.

Stevie Manns:

I had to sell it to the sales guys and the sales guys had to get a sponsor for it and

Stevie Manns:

come, you know, Ooh, gosh, nearly 10 years later, I thought I don't need a radio

Stevie Manns:

station for me to be able to do this.

Stevie Manns:

So I thought I can just create my own podcast and do the show like

Stevie Manns:

the segment as an entire show.

Stevie Manns:

And so that's how my podcast developed.

Stevie Manns:

And I was a musician in New York city.

Stevie Manns:

And for me it was, it was a couple fold really because I

Stevie Manns:

was a new musician on the music.

Stevie Manns:

And it's really difficult.

Stevie Manns:

New York works very differently to almost any other city or certainly

Stevie Manns:

the way, the way that it had for me in the UK, where you tend to get in touch

Stevie Manns:

with a venue, a touring artist comes round and you say, you know, that that

Stevie Manns:

artist is sort of within my genre.

Stevie Manns:

Can I get on the bill for that in New York?

Stevie Manns:

Because it's the big city.

Stevie Manns:

If a major artist comes to New York, they tend to bring somebody who is on

Stevie Manns:

their label, but lower down in the PA you know, the pecking order with them.

Stevie Manns:

So your chances to get in front of an audience are actually much slimmer.

Stevie Manns:

And you've got to, if you get a show at a venue, you've actually

Stevie Manns:

got to bring an audience already.

Stevie Manns:

And so it was kind of chicken and egg, because if you can't get in front of an

Stevie Manns:

audience, how do you bring an audience?

Stevie Manns:

And so what I started doing was I created, um, an artist circle where I had like

Stevie Manns:

a Nashville style round, where you had like three artists on stage together,

Stevie Manns:

and you would kind of cross pollinate audiences and hopefully you would, you

Stevie Manns:

know, be able to, to build off that.

Stevie Manns:

As, uh, we would do this maybe every other month.

Stevie Manns:

And so between shows, I said, well, in order to help us create this event

Stevie Manns:

series that we're doing, let's create a podcast where we interview the musicians

Stevie Manns:

that are going to be in the show.

Stevie Manns:

And that way, if people don't know who the artists are, they get to listen

Stevie Manns:

to them ahead of like, you know, putting out 15 bucks to come to a show.

Stevie Manns:

And then we build up the mailing list and so on.

Stevie Manns:

So it started off.

Stevie Manns:

You know, a podcast in addition to a music event series.

Stevie Manns:

And then with the pandemic, obviously the podcast took over because there

Stevie Manns:

was no event series that we could do.

Stevie Manns:

Um, and then it became really interesting for me of like, okay, how can I support

Stevie Manns:

my community versus, you know, it being something to support our series.

Stevie Manns:

So it had, you know, some sort of, uh, you know, an interesting, um,

Stevie Manns:

birth, if birthplace, if you like.

Stevie Manns:

And then I started doing another podcast with a friend that was

Stevie Manns:

sort of an aftershave podcast.

Stevie Manns:

It's entirely just a, uh, you know, pleasure podcast for me, which, you

Stevie Manns:

know, has got a niche market, star Trek.

Stevie Manns:

Um, but it's, it's just pure fun.

Stevie Manns:

And I think, you know, I was starting to do this and I thought, oh, you know,

Stevie Manns:

if I want to, if I want to go into this, how else can I, can I do this?

Stevie Manns:

And I started to help friends who had podcasts and I would help them edit.

Stevie Manns:

And then when I was thinking of.

Stevie Manns:

Getting a client.

Stevie Manns:

Um, there was somebody that I reached out to and she was an environmental

Stevie Manns:

activist and she's from the UK.

Stevie Manns:

And I remember that she had done, um, an event coming to the U S and

Stevie Manns:

she'd like paddle boarding down the Hudson and was raising awareness

Stevie Manns:

about plastic pollution years ago.

Stevie Manns:

And I reached out to her and I was like, do you have a podcast?

Stevie Manns:

And it was genuinely, wasn't a pitch, but I was like, I would listen

Stevie Manns:

to that podcast if you had one.

Stevie Manns:

And she goes, well, it's funny you say that.

Stevie Manns:

And she said, I am launching one with this company, but they aren't

Stevie Manns:

going to manage it, post the launch.

Stevie Manns:

And so I just happened to reach out to her at the right time.

Stevie Manns:

And we started working together after.

Stevie Manns:

And then thereafter, I think there was, there was somebody else that I

Stevie Manns:

was working with on another project.

Stevie Manns:

And they were like, oh, I need somebody to do a podcast.

Stevie Manns:

Would, you know, are you interested in that?

Stevie Manns:

And we could trade.

Stevie Manns:

And that's how I sort of got my second client.

Stevie Manns:

So that's kind of how it started.

Stevie Manns:

And, you know, it's, it's probably not from the inception of last year, June.

Stevie Manns:

It was probably two years prior to that where I really took an interest in, you

Stevie Manns:

know, I ha I had the, the joy and the desire to be a podcaster, first of all.

Stevie Manns:

And I think you have to have that before you even begin and you don't necessarily

Stevie Manns:

have to have that you're editing.

Stevie Manns:

But for me, if I'm going to listen to something I need to know what's good

Stevie Manns:

and how it sounds and what's engaging.

Stevie Manns:

And for me, that was by doing it.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah, I would, I would definitely agree.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, I definitely fell in love with podcasting before

Bryan Entzminger:

I fell in love with editing.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I think that some of that experience.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, trying to like me trying to figure out how can I make my show not suck, right?

Bryan Entzminger:

Like how can I make this not drag on for it?

Bryan Entzminger:

Like all of that stuff then becomes those things that I can bring to a client who

Bryan Entzminger:

is saying, Hey, feels like my is dragging.

Bryan Entzminger:

What can I do?

Bryan Entzminger:

And I said, well, have you thought about this?

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so it's really cool that you cut your teeth on that.

Bryan Entzminger:

And Ashley says that, uh, she loves this.

Bryan Entzminger:

I would agree at the, the story of the first client is like the thing that a

Bryan Entzminger:

lot of people at a lot of people ask me, how do I find my first client?

Bryan Entzminger:

How like all of that, I don't have a portfolio.

Bryan Entzminger:

How do I edit for somebody so I can get like all of that.

Bryan Entzminger:

I love how you shared that from your, your venue experience, but

Bryan Entzminger:

then also getting the first client.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then that second client did after that, did you have to start

Bryan Entzminger:

going out and getting clients.

Bryan Entzminger:

What did that look like?

Bryan Entzminger:

Is it

Stevie Manns:

I'm still in that period?

Stevie Manns:

I'm still in that kind of looking.

Stevie Manns:

And to be honest, it's, it's difficult because I have, my

Stevie Manns:

corporate job is 60 hours a week.

Stevie Manns:

And then I edit my own pod, my own two podcasts, plus two

Stevie Manns:

client podcasts on top of that.

Stevie Manns:

So I really don't at the moment, have time to take on this third,

Stevie Manns:

like a third, fourth, whatever.

Stevie Manns:

So I kind of, I just need to get rid of this corporate job

Stevie Manns:

to enable me to kind of do that.

Stevie Manns:

And yeah, that quite honestly, I need, I need help and lessons in

Stevie Manns:

how to, to search for clients.

Stevie Manns:

And I'm like, do I really want to DM people?

Stevie Manns:

Or do I want to, you know, how do I want to do that?

Stevie Manns:

Do I want to kind of reach out to editors who have, you know, too much

Stevie Manns:

stuff and they need to outsource, you know, do I want to be doing that?

Stevie Manns:

Like, I'm still figuring out all of, all of the rest of it.

Stevie Manns:

So I, I do not, I will fully admit this.

Stevie Manns:

I don't have it all fully baked yet and I'm still figuring out, Hey, do I, do I

Stevie Manns:

want to create my own editing business?

Stevie Manns:

Do I want to work for a production?

Stevie Manns:

I'm still exploring all of this stuff.

Stevie Manns:

And I'm like, I'm lucky enough that I have the space and, and financial stability

Stevie Manns:

to be able to do that for a few months.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

One thing that I do want to make note of, like, I feel like for me, so I did

Daniel Abendroth:

have like the client base to support me financially before I went full time.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, but I think it is good to know that that doesn't

Daniel Abendroth:

necessarily have to be the case.

Daniel Abendroth:

So you are fortunate in your job.

Daniel Abendroth:

Do we, I remember if we talked about this before we started recording or not

Daniel Abendroth:

the background, your do your job in, um,

Stevie Manns:

hi, I'm able to leave my job.

Stevie Manns:

Um, I'm not entirely sure that I can talk about that.

Stevie Manns:

Yeah.

Stevie Manns:

Well, I guess my

Daniel Abendroth:

point is like, um, your job situation allows you to go

Daniel Abendroth:

full-time as podcast editor, before you have the clients to, um, like a full.

Daniel Abendroth:

Capacity business.

Stevie Manns:

I guess I took the option of being made redundant.

Stevie Manns:

I can say that, uh, and that, that sort of redundancy packages allowing

Stevie Manns:

me to have a bit of financial security.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

So you don't have to have like, um, a whole bunch of clients before, so you

Daniel Abendroth:

can be more creative in how you like make the transition from full-time to,

Daniel Abendroth:

or I guess from part-time to full-time.

Stevie Manns:

Yeah.

Stevie Manns:

Um, I also, you know, I'm also married, my me and my wife were able to kind of

Stevie Manns:

manage this and like she's, she's helping me to, to have this sort of freedom for

Stevie Manns:

a little while to be able to do this.

Stevie Manns:

Um, so I, I fully appreciate that this is not the easiest thing for most people.

Stevie Manns:

And I have been in that situation where I was like, I was living in New York city.

Stevie Manns:

I couldn't, you know, new York's New York, city's expensive.

Stevie Manns:

Um, I could, I couldn't do that.

Stevie Manns:

And I was also on a, you know, I was also on a visa and if I didn't have

Stevie Manns:

my visa from my corporate job, then I couldn't stay in this country.

Stevie Manns:

So for me, it was definitely just one, one thing was dependent on, on other,

Stevie Manns:

and it wouldn't have been possible for me in almost any other way.

Stevie Manns:

So I, I do fully appreciate I'm, uh, I'm in a really privileged

Stevie Manns:

position to be able to do

Daniel Abendroth:

this.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah, I know for me, because like one thing that's difficult is there's

Daniel Abendroth:

only so much editing work you can take on when you have a full-time job.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Cause you work, you know, like in your case, 60 hours a week, and then trying

Daniel Abendroth:

to fit in those few hours, you have in the evenings on the weekends, um,

Daniel Abendroth:

to build a job that makes enough to.

Daniel Abendroth:

Cover your expenses.

Daniel Abendroth:

It's really difficult.

Daniel Abendroth:

And I was fortunate that I had one very, very profitable client that was

Daniel Abendroth:

able to, um, kind of get me over that hump so I could quit my job and then

Daniel Abendroth:

work on building up my portfolio by where you're about to say something.

Daniel Abendroth:

I'm sorry,

Bryan Entzminger:

go ahead, Stevie.

Bryan Entzminger:

I think you're going to say no,

Stevie Manns:

no, I was just going to ask, you know, and how,

Stevie Manns:

what was the time period for you?

Daniel Abendroth:

For me?

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah,

Stevie Manns:

just from kind of, you know, starting out and

Stevie Manns:

then, because I'm full time.

Stevie Manns:

So

Daniel Abendroth:I started my own podcast in:Daniel Abendroth:

couple months after that I started selling my services on fiber.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, and we did actually, um, so if you're interested in all of our, uh,

Daniel Abendroth:

origin stories, like how we got our first clients, we did do an episode on that.

Daniel Abendroth:

And go ahead and check the show notes.

Daniel Abendroth:

Once this episode is released on the podcast for a link to that episode, I

Daniel Abendroth:

can't remember exactly which one it was.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, so a few months after I kind of essentially my

Daniel Abendroth:

podcasts kind of floundered.

Daniel Abendroth:Fiverr or towards the end of:Daniel Abendroth:And then it was at the end of:Daniel Abendroth:

and quit my job in podcast editing.

Daniel Abendroth:

Full-time

Stevie Manns:

okay.

Stevie Manns:

So that's really, I mean, two to

Daniel Abendroth:

two or so years.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah, probably about a little over, almost two and a half years.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, I'm way slower than Daniel.

Bryan Entzminger:

I think I'm three and a half or four years into this and

Bryan Entzminger:

still working my full-time job.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

I got really lucky that I had a client that was paying like $25 for per minute.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah, sorry.

Stevie Manns:

My eyebrows don't translate to audio, but they went up,

Daniel Abendroth:

um, there were like seven to eight minute almost kind of like

Daniel Abendroth:

news clips, like for like a news reel.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, but I had to like find and hire, I didn't have to pay, but I had to like

Daniel Abendroth:

find voice actors to read these, go back and forth to all the revisions.

Daniel Abendroth:

So it was more as much more of a process, but it was definitely,

Daniel Abendroth:

um, yeah, extremely profitable.

Daniel Abendroth:

And like the amount of work I got from them was able to like

Daniel Abendroth:

really, um, give me enough work and finances to make that transition.

Stevie Manns:

So you, for you, it was mostly sort of our fiber and then you

Stevie Manns:

started to find clients outside of fiber.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

So for me it was, yeah, I started on a fiver and then I just had

Daniel Abendroth:

one client who was a life coach.

Daniel Abendroth:

We started working together.

Daniel Abendroth:

Cause it's

Stevie Manns:

such an inter like it's such an, it's just a whole thing in podcasting.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Live coaching and podcasts.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like it's a really strong like mayors for podcasting is such

Daniel Abendroth:

a great tool for life coaching.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, but it was just kind of word of mouth.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like pretty much I've never done any kind of marketing.

Daniel Abendroth:

It's just, I had that one client who referred another client who

Daniel Abendroth:

referred another one who referred to, and it's just kind of like most

Daniel Abendroth:

of our clients are word of mouth.

Stevie Manns:

Gotcha.

Stevie Manns:

And Brian, what about you?

Bryan Entzminger:

Uh, in terms of the transition, I started

Bryan Entzminger:

with my first client for free.

Bryan Entzminger:

Uh, he had been a guest on my show and was looking to do something and he put a

Bryan Entzminger:

segment together for my show for a while.

Bryan Entzminger:

Then we spun that off into its own show.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then, uh, I dunno, probably a year into that, or so I was actively going out

Bryan Entzminger:

and looking for clients at that point.

Bryan Entzminger:

And somebody who runs a production company contacted me and said,

Bryan Entzminger:

Hey, would you do the editing out?

Bryan Entzminger:

You know, would you white label for me?

Bryan Entzminger:

I'll bring in the shows you do the editing.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so I still have 44 shows through her that I am responsible for.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then I've kind of picked up a couple here and there currently

Bryan Entzminger:

have nine shows that I'm working on, uh, varying production schedules.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I'm now in the place where I've started bringing in some editors because.

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm at capacity.

Bryan Entzminger:

And when I say at capacity, probably at like 115%.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so having brought in other people has definitely helped, although there

Bryan Entzminger:

is the onboarding process, right.

Bryan Entzminger:

And that's, that's something that I started late last year.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I've got now three people that are helping me one show each.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, but it's, it's a, it's a process.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cause I don't want to bring everybody on at once.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so that's been a bit of a challenge and it's also, it's a different way

Bryan Entzminger:

about thinking about the money, right.

Bryan Entzminger:

Because before I could think about it and go, what's this worth to me now I have

Bryan Entzminger:

to think about it in terms of what's my management overhead, plus what I need

Bryan Entzminger:

to pay them to make this make sense.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so that's been a, a bit of a, a brain thing for me.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, I I'm wondering as you've, as you're thinking about this,

Bryan Entzminger:

how do you approach pricing?

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

So you're making the move.

Bryan Entzminger:

How do you like, do you have any thoughts around how you put that together?

Stevie Manns:

Ah, I feel the pricing that I have done for the two clients

Stevie Manns:

that I've taken on initially was.

Stevie Manns:

What exactly are you looking to do?

Stevie Manns:

Because I feel, you know, obviously everyone's podcast needs

Stevie Manns:

are different, so it was okay.

Stevie Manns:

Well, how much of my time do you need really?

Stevie Manns:

And what extras do you want if you just want a basic editing and it's

Stevie Manns:

30 minutes, it's this, if you want more than basic editing and you want,

Stevie Manns:

um, you know, you want some creative production and you want, you know, mid

Stevie Manns:

season analytics, if you're doing a season and both of my clients actually

Stevie Manns:

do do seasons versus we, you know, weekly, um, then it's going to be this.

Stevie Manns:

And, you know, so, and I think part of my, part of my skillset

Stevie Manns:

from some of the corporate stuff has been a lot of data analytics.

Stevie Manns:

Excuse me.

Stevie Manns:

I love XL.

Stevie Manns:

I was going to swear, but I really do love it.

Stevie Manns:

Um, and I really, you know, I think there's a lot of power in, in data

Stevie Manns:

and, and, and, you know, analytics and creating, you know, different

Stevie Manns:

spreadsheets and charts and things.

Stevie Manns:

I get really excited by pivot tables, um,

Daniel Abendroth:

nerd

Stevie Manns:

alert, right.

Stevie Manns:

Hard alert.

Stevie Manns:

Right?

Stevie Manns:

Yeah.

Stevie Manns:

Um, so, you know, for me, that's kind of like an extra that I can add on if

Stevie Manns:

somebody wants that and you're able to pull down that data and stuff,

Stevie Manns:

which I quite enjoy because I'm like, I have certainly seen a difference

Stevie Manns:

in when I have given that to a client than worse than versus when I haven't.

Stevie Manns:

Um, so I certainly say, okay, what exactly do you need?

Stevie Manns:

And then I figure out like water, what is my time to it?

Stevie Manns:

Because I think for me, my, you know, working 60 hours a week,

Stevie Manns:

I don't have a lot of time.

Stevie Manns:

So I'm like, okay, how much time will this take me?

Stevie Manns:

And then I sort of price it off that.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

One thing I found like a good strategy is trying to.

Daniel Abendroth:

This is going to sound weird, but get the most out of each client.

Daniel Abendroth:

So rather than trying to get like 20 clients that are paying you to like,

Daniel Abendroth:

just edit their episodes, getting 10 clients, that's paying you more

Daniel Abendroth:

to edit, manage, do like analytics stuff like, oh, so doing more work

Daniel Abendroth:

because it's easier and a lot less like brain power to manage fewer clients.

Daniel Abendroth:

But at a higher rate,

Stevie Manns:

I get so much more satisfaction doing all of like more of

Stevie Manns:

it doing the creative process with them.

Stevie Manns:

And then, you know, having discussions about who do they

Stevie Manns:

want to have on their show.

Stevie Manns:

And like one of the reasons I like the clients that I have, I've kind

Stevie Manns:

of chosen them to an extent where I'm interested in the subject matter.

Stevie Manns:

And I have, you know, some, some knowledge on.

Stevie Manns:

What their subject is and who would be a good fit and have

Stevie Manns:

their thought about this.

Stevie Manns:

And, and I love the, I think that's, that's certainly a direction I would like

Stevie Manns:

to explore in terms of my own career.

Stevie Manns:

Is that creative process.

Stevie Manns:

And, and the more like of the producer side, as well as the

Stevie Manns:

editing, I'm happy to do both for now.

Stevie Manns:

Not necessarily if I have to, because I think there's a lot to be learned by doing

Stevie Manns:

everything at once, but I definitely want to go in a, sort of a creative direction

Stevie Manns:

and that sort of producer role also.

Stevie Manns:

And yes, it will also earn me more

Daniel Abendroth:

money.

Bryan Entzminger:

It does.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

Uh, so I, I recently added management services to one of

Bryan Entzminger:

my clients who has two shows.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I will say that it's nice to be able to know that I'm serving him more deeply.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, It's been a while because both of my previous shows are on

Bryan Entzminger:

hiatus because I'm at capacity.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so it's been a while since I've written show notes and

Bryan Entzminger:

created graphics and scheduled all the social media and everything.

Bryan Entzminger:

So like the first week of doing that for him was like, oh yeah,

Bryan Entzminger:

I remember how much work this is.

Bryan Entzminger:

I probably under-priced

Daniel Abendroth:

myself.

Stevie Manns:

It's a lot of work.

Stevie Manns:

I do all of that.

Stevie Manns:

I do the audio grams, you know, do the show notes, all of that stuff.

Stevie Manns:

And like, and now one of the things that I'm, I want to learn

Stevie Manns:

as part of my thing is, is video.

Stevie Manns:

And it's like final cut pro or it's like Adobe, premier.

Stevie Manns:

And I'm like, so that I can create, you know, really engaging video is

Stevie Manns:

part of their, their podcast content.

Stevie Manns:

And that's, you know, another skill to my bow and that's more than I can, you

Stevie Manns:

know, that I could be, I could charge

Daniel Abendroth:

for

Bryan Entzminger:

definitely.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, Ashley had a comment that you're moving more toward a producer than

Bryan Entzminger:

an editor, which is where, uh, her interests lie, tend to lean as well.

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm wondering, you know, you.

Bryan Entzminger:

You had the show, so obviously you've got experience, but did you also have

Bryan Entzminger:

any training or anything that helped you to kind of step into that role

Stevie Manns:

with my client, with my, uh,

Bryan Entzminger:

uh, w with your clients?

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

To help them through the process?

Stevie Manns:

I think probably just from my own experience as a creative,

Stevie Manns:

um, being a musician in terms of, you know, like I've, I've done

Stevie Manns:

two fully studio produced albums.

Stevie Manns:

So I've been in a situation where I have to kind of direct, I have to project

Stevie Manns:

manage and I have to, I've been, you know, obviously, and I think I've

Stevie Manns:

had to come to that realization of, I am the person whose project this is,

Stevie Manns:

and I know that I am not the drummer.

Stevie Manns:

I know that I'm not the bass player, you know, I might look like, and

Stevie Manns:

I have to kind of go, I know what I like versus I know everything.

Stevie Manns:

And you have to somewhat go to these people.

Stevie Manns:

You know, the people that you're working with, you.

Stevie Manns:

I trust that you can do this, but I will know what I want as an overall project.

Stevie Manns:

And so I think in terms of the creative process, you, you know, when I write a

Stevie Manns:

song, I know you start off with, Hey, this, I'm not sure if you're familiar

Stevie Manns:

with the, the sort of trajectory.

Stevie Manns:

Some people put it out there, but it's, it's like you start a song and you're

Stevie Manns:

like, oh, I'm nervous about this.

Stevie Manns:

And then it's like, oh, I think this might be okay.

Stevie Manns:

And then you're like, oh yeah, I'm really into this.

Stevie Manns:

And you're like, oh, I think this might be a bit shit.

Stevie Manns:

And then you're like, oh, I'm I'm shit.

Stevie Manns:

And then you're like, oh actually this is okay in the end.

Stevie Manns:

And so you sort of go through this whole process of, of sort

Stevie Manns:

of loving it self-loathing and coming out on the other side.

Stevie Manns:

And it's, it's really similar for everyone.

Stevie Manns:

And, um, if you are an artist, I'm sure you will have heard of

Stevie Manns:

Julia Cameron's the artist's way.

Stevie Manns:

And she talks through that, that whole thing.

Stevie Manns:

So for me, it was, it's mostly sort of a lot of trust and, um, reliance on.

Stevie Manns:

The creative process and knowing what that is for me as an artist and being

Stevie Manns:

able to translate that to a podcast and go, you know, I like also, it's, it's,

Stevie Manns:

it's knowing what you like when you listen to podcasts and, and going, okay.

Stevie Manns:

I, you know, I know what the quality is that I'm looking for and in terms

Stevie Manns:

of what I want to create and the, the vibe of it, I think you need

Stevie Manns:

to really stay true to, to that.

Stevie Manns:

Um, and, and just really trusting yourself with it.

Stevie Manns:

I think I rambled there was, that was, that did that answer.

Bryan Entzminger:

I want to let Daniel talk cause I keep jumping right in,

Daniel Abendroth:

so I don't know.

Daniel Abendroth:

You're totally fine.

Daniel Abendroth:

Tuned to change subject to any anyway.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, so have you thought about.

Daniel Abendroth:

What it'll be like to not have structure or like, have

Daniel Abendroth:

to create your own structure.

Daniel Abendroth:

I am

Daniel Abendroth:

terrified.

Stevie Manns:

I am terrified, so terrified in fact, this week, but I was like,

Stevie Manns:

oh my God, how am I going to do this?

Stevie Manns:

And I downloaded Microsoft office because outlook is the thing that I've

Stevie Manns:

been using to kind of structure my day.

Stevie Manns:

So that was the thing that I have, you know, that's really the tool that I'm

Stevie Manns:

like, I think this is going to be the tool that's going to help me do this.

Stevie Manns:

And whether it, you know, I use this tool for, you know, I have a little

Stevie Manns:

bit of time off and like, what do I want to do for my own self development?

Stevie Manns:

And how am I going to schedule my time?

Stevie Manns:

That's as far as I've gotten with, this is the tool that I'm going to use.

Stevie Manns:

And then what are the things that I want to achieve within this time?

Stevie Manns:

Um, in terms of up-skilling and, you know, project management and stuff.

Stevie Manns:

But I, I think it's, I I'm terrified.

Stevie Manns:

I think I have, you know, I've been working in a corporate job for the

Stevie Manns:

last 14 years, so I think I'm like, okay, let's get up and let's start work

Stevie Manns:

at eight o'clock let's have a coffee and then let's go until like six.

Stevie Manns:

So it may be that I'm not entirely sure.

Stevie Manns:

We'll, we'll have to see how it goes.

Bryan Entzminger:

Uh, I will tell you that the thing that scares me about

Bryan Entzminger:

the thought of going full time is that after several years of doing full-time

Bryan Entzminger:

plus editing eight, nine shows on a regular basis that I'll crash, right.

Bryan Entzminger:

That I'll come in with, nobody telling me to get up and get exact,

Bryan Entzminger:

get to work at exactly this time.

Bryan Entzminger:

And like, just totally bomb because I'm, I mean, on some level I'm worn out.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so there there's a need for that, but it has to come at pace because I

Bryan Entzminger:

still have to generate revenue too.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I think you hit the nail on the head, like that does scare me.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

And being aware and like coming up with a plan, um, 'cause I remember, it's just

Daniel Abendroth:

like, I think one of the pieces of advice that you hear a lot is when you work

Daniel Abendroth:

from home or like work for yourself is still dressed like a go into the office.

Daniel Abendroth:

And I think that's just a load.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like I'm not going to get like a suit and tie and crab and like to sit at my

Daniel Abendroth:

desk, like, I'll wear my pajamas to,

Stevie Manns:

I take the dogs out regularly.

Stevie Manns:

So if I were to do that and walk outside with the dogs and then walked

Stevie Manns:

back in, it would look bizarre.

Stevie Manns:

So I, I, I think what I, what I have done, I think since the pandemic

Stevie Manns:

starts, that's given me this whole, like what is working from home?

Stevie Manns:

Like, and one thing, you know, That I made sure that I started to do was okay.

Stevie Manns:

Let's have some structure to my day.

Stevie Manns:

And that structure was, I get up, you know, I will have

Stevie Manns:

to get up at the same time.

Stevie Manns:

My wife, dear Lord gets up at four o'clock.

Stevie Manns:

She has to commute.

Stevie Manns:

So, you know, the dogs get up and I know it's horrendous, but it is what it is.

Stevie Manns:

And to some extent, and like, it starts my day and I have coffee

Stevie Manns:

and I watch the news and then I'm like, okay, so this is starting to

Stevie Manns:

form my day and I'll start work.

Stevie Manns:

I have to take the dogs out and I will make sure that I have a gym break.

Stevie Manns:

So I'm like, okay, let's structure these things into my day and then let's

Stevie Manns:

work these other things around and then let's finish at a certain time.

Stevie Manns:

And I think for me having those things at certain points allows me

Stevie Manns:

to go, okay, this is something that I need to do before this break.

Stevie Manns:

This is something that I need to do before this break.

Stevie Manns:

But, you know, as I say, beginning of the pandemic, when it started that I

Stevie Manns:

was like, I need to get up and shower.

Stevie Manns:

Like, that's something that I have to do.

Stevie Manns:

As, as a human being, but also, you know, like I didn't

Stevie Manns:

want to leave it until later.

Stevie Manns:

I'm like, no, this, like, it just starts off your day in a certain way.

Stevie Manns:

And you know, you don't necessarily need to get up and get dressed in a suit.

Stevie Manns:

But I think if you have some sort of like structure to your day and

Stevie Manns:

you started at a certain point, I think that's probably enough.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I'm sort of like morning routine.

Bryan Entzminger:

I mean, I will say that for the first year of working

Bryan Entzminger:

from home when the pandemic hit, cause I'm still working from home.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, I did, I mean, this is me dressed for work.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I did that five days a week now I'm more like two or three days a week.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then the other days are t-shirt days, but I still put my clothes on.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

Like I, I, I have to do that part or it just doesn't feel right

Bryan Entzminger:

now, Saturdays are different deal.

Bryan Entzminger:

Like get dressed when I get dressed that Saturday.

Bryan Entzminger:

But on weekdays, that's how I do it.

Stevie Manns:

There's a real mental thing that happens when you do that.

Stevie Manns:

And it's, it's, it's part of self.

Stevie Manns:

Like it's, it's just so important for, for my own mental health and

Stevie Manns:

long story short, but I ended up having to go to Mexico for four months

Stevie Manns:

as part of this whole visa thing.

Stevie Manns:

And it, through my routine, I had a, I had a really comfortable routine and I would

Stevie Manns:

get up in the morning and I would, you know, I, I like my, I like masterclass.

Stevie Manns:

I watch a masterclass for 10, 15 minutes.

Stevie Manns:

I watched the news for 10, 15 minutes.

Stevie Manns:

I write in my gratitude journal.

Stevie Manns:

I meditate.

Stevie Manns:

That was what I was doing.

Stevie Manns:

And then I went to Mexico and I was like, oh, how am I going

Stevie Manns:

to get back into this routine?

Stevie Manns:

Because it, and it took about me.

Stevie Manns:

It wasn't difficult to do.

Stevie Manns:

It was just you're out of it and things aren't in the same place.

Stevie Manns:

You're thrown around a little bit.

Stevie Manns:

Like I didn't have a cattle to make my coffee stupid, stupid

Stevie Manns:

little things threw me off.

Stevie Manns:

And then I had to find my way back into this routine.

Stevie Manns:

And that was the structure that quite honestly kept me sane because I had

Stevie Manns:

to go there by myself for four months.

Stevie Manns:

And my me and my dog.

Stevie Manns:

And I didn't know anyone and I, my Spanish was not great it's we went to our Rita,

Stevie Manns:

however, it wasn't great at the time.

Stevie Manns:

And that was the thing that allowed me, you know, that, that structure

Stevie Manns:

helped me really, really start my day.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

We've got a comment from Ashley's saying yep.

Daniel Abendroth:

Almost Stevie formal work wear isn't necessary, but some kind

Daniel Abendroth:

of morning routine or getting dressed in the morning or getting

Daniel Abendroth:

dressed that makes you feel alive.

Daniel Abendroth:

It makes a huge difference.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yes.

Daniel Abendroth:

Ashley and Andrea had a very good, uh, where's it, there it is.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, it took me a while to learn when is best for me to work and not

Daniel Abendroth:

default to traditional business hours.

Daniel Abendroth:

Because one thing I noticed for me is like, I'm pretty good in the morning.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, and then launch, then I like to take a nap and then like, uh, mid, late afternoon

Daniel Abendroth:

is like when I'm really productive.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, so I know.

Daniel Abendroth:

I can't do so I, what I tend to try to do at least before I got a dog

Daniel Abendroth:

that completely wrecked our schedule.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, well, it's kinda mourning a little bit of obligation.

Daniel Abendroth:

So like I have a, an assistant that will like, uh, listen to my episodes

Daniel Abendroth:

and then send me revisions of anything I missed or any tweaks I need.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, I was like, that'll do first thing, business stuff.

Daniel Abendroth:

But then I know, like in the afternoon, if I try to do something in the morning,

Daniel Abendroth:

then it's hard for me to focus on editing.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I know my work isn't going to be as good.

Daniel Abendroth:

So it's about like learning, um, where your most productive and like

Daniel Abendroth:

Andrea was saying that you don't have to stick to traditional business

Daniel Abendroth:

hours like that nine to five.

Daniel Abendroth:

I

Stevie Manns:

think we find what works for you.

Stevie Manns:

I think just because I have been in that situation for my entire working

Stevie Manns:

life, I think that's probably the easiest way for me to transition.

Stevie Manns:

I may transition out of it.

Stevie Manns:

I may end up working late nights who knows.

Stevie Manns:

We'll see.

Stevie Manns:

Yeah,

Daniel Abendroth:

I think it was pat Flynn.

Daniel Abendroth:

I was listening to that's it, like, he ended up working like

Daniel Abendroth:

in the middle of the night.

Daniel Abendroth:

Cause that's whenever work best for him.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like he's the most productive and that gave him like the freedom during

Daniel Abendroth:

the day to spend time with his kids.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Stevie Manns:

Oh, go ahead.

Stevie Manns:

Sorry.

Stevie Manns:

No, I was just gonna say a lot of people have like, in terms of

Stevie Manns:

sleeping habits and like the, yeah, I think you've got a circadian rhythm.

Stevie Manns:

A lot of people's are different and some people work better

Stevie Manns:

at night because of that.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

And a lot of people will say like, you need to get up like early in the

Daniel Abendroth:

morning to do your morning routine.

Daniel Abendroth:

And that way, like to get a good Sergeant today day, it's like,

Daniel Abendroth:

that's not true for everybody.

Daniel Abendroth:

So it's like, don't feel, don't like, don't feel ashamed because like you don't

Daniel Abendroth:

follow, like, cause you're not getting up at four in the morning to do like your

Daniel Abendroth:

morning workout before you go to work.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like, that's fine.

Daniel Abendroth:

If that's not what works best for you.

Bryan Entzminger:

I've been thinking through like some of this kind of

Bryan Entzminger:

struggling with it, because for a while, my editing business has been like 5, 5

Bryan Entzminger:

30 in the morning until six 30 or so.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then again, like call it eight 30 at night until 10.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

So my, my business hours are when everybody else is not working,

Bryan Entzminger:

I've been kind of wondering, like, does that continue?

Bryan Entzminger:

Like, or do I transition to something more like what Steve is talking about

Bryan Entzminger:

with traditional business hours?

Bryan Entzminger:

Cause I do have traditional business hours.

Bryan Entzminger:

It's just not for my businesses for my job.

Bryan Entzminger:

And that's, that's one of the things I've been wondering is like, do I, at

Bryan Entzminger:

some point start putting barriers on my day and say, I now work normal people,

Bryan Entzminger:

hours in quotes, normal people hours.

Bryan Entzminger:

Uh, so I'm not available at odd times, but I am actually available when you

Bryan Entzminger:

are aware as right now, I'm typically available when other people aren't,

Bryan Entzminger:

unless they're in Europe or Australia, that, um, then I'm good to go.

Stevie Manns:

I'm curious.

Stevie Manns:

I have, I have many questions for you, Brian.

Stevie Manns:

One of them I think, is around.

Stevie Manns:

And as a creative, I hear that creating boundaries or limits for yourself

Stevie Manns:

can be really helpful and productive.

Stevie Manns:

And I'm curious if you've thought about like, creating that limit for

Stevie Manns:

yourself and what that would be.

Stevie Manns:

So that's my first question.

Stevie Manns:

So I'll let you answer that before I asked myself, so

Bryan Entzminger:

I've thought about that, but in a lot of ways, my, the

Bryan Entzminger:

boundaries have already been created.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cause I, I have a day job.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

And they sort of expect me to do that work so that that's a boundary that's there.

Stevie Manns:

May I ask what that is?

Stevie Manns:

Or, yeah, I

Bryan Entzminger:

work as a, uh, I work in analytics.

Bryan Entzminger:

I do network, uh, logistics network modeling for a large pet food company.

Bryan Entzminger:

Uh, so manufacturing, distribution, all that kind of stuff.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so that's a fairly engaging job for the call it eight to five ish range.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then I've also got kids and volunteering and stuff.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so like I have boundaries where I have to say.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't want to say half to that makes it sound bad.

Bryan Entzminger:

I have time that I have planned to spend with my family and I have

Bryan Entzminger:

some time planned into my week.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's set aside for not working, but beyond that, the

Bryan Entzminger:

boundaries are pretty much set.

Bryan Entzminger:

I mean, eventually I have to sleep, right.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I can't go past like 10 30 is usually when I try to end so that

Bryan Entzminger:

I can spend a little bit of time with my wife before I go to bed.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then I'm typically up at five to feed the dog.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then shortly after that, I'll start working until like six 30

Bryan Entzminger:

when it's time for my son to go to school, say, say goodbye to him.

Bryan Entzminger:

Do that whole thing.

Bryan Entzminger:

So like in a lot of ways right now, my boundaries are there.

Bryan Entzminger:

If those boundaries were gone, that's what has me concerned?

Stevie Manns:

I don't know.

Stevie Manns:

I don't know your situation.

Stevie Manns:

I'm just gonna ask this question, but have you asked your employer, whether

Stevie Manns:

you could come back a day a week?

Stevie Manns:

I

Bryan Entzminger:

haven't yet because I'm not sure that I'm at the place to do that.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, there are.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, my workload at work is more than one person's workload.

Bryan Entzminger:

And I don't say that like, look what they're doing to me.

Bryan Entzminger:

I mean, it's just this constant conversation about prioritizing

Bryan Entzminger:

and what's going to get done next and what gets pushed off.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I'm not sure that they would be willing to have that conversation.

Bryan Entzminger:

Although it's something that I have in the back of my mind, for sure.

Stevie Manns:

I have been very surprised at what people have

Stevie Manns:

been willing to negotiate.

Stevie Manns:

Like when I like the few times in my life where I have said, this is what I want.

Stevie Manns:

I'm like, it's, it's a hard, no, for me, um, I've been really surprised at what

Stevie Manns:

people like people and employers will do.

Stevie Manns:

If you say this is, this is a no go for me and I will walk away

Stevie Manns:

from this and I've genuinely meant it because I CA I couldn't do.

Stevie Manns:

Any more, but I've been really surprised with what people would come back with.

Stevie Manns:

And I'm not suggesting that you walk into your employer's office.

Stevie Manns:

I quit if you don't give me one deal, but I'm just curious if, if, um, you've

Stevie Manns:

maybe considered something like that.

Stevie Manns:

But,

Bryan Entzminger:

uh, I have in the past, for sure.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, not recently because the workload went right, uh, with, with all of the changes

Bryan Entzminger:

in how retail works in the U S over the last year, like we're redoing all of our

Bryan Entzminger:

five-year plans from like two years ago.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cause nothing is the same.

Bryan Entzminger:

Everything is totally different.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so now we have to validate all of the stuff that we thought we were going to do.

Bryan Entzminger:

Well, I'm going to stop there cause this isn't about that job.

Stevie Manns:

Right.

Stevie Manns:

But if you, but do you think that if you had the time to go full, like for

Stevie Manns:

instance, if you, if your job, for instance went away, not an, I don't

Stevie Manns:

wish that upon you, if that is not your choice, but if it did go away, do you

Stevie Manns:

think that you would be able to fill that void with your editing class?

Bryan Entzminger:

I think it'd be, I think it'd be pretty

Bryan Entzminger:

hairy for a couple of months.

Bryan Entzminger:

I think after.

Bryan Entzminger:

I probably could, um, going out and getting clients is not my strong suit.

Bryan Entzminger:

Uh, you mentioned not wanting to be in people's DMS.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's like, I'm sorry, but the cold sales conversations, those creep me

Bryan Entzminger:

out on both sides of the conversation.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I'm sort of moving into some areas where I'm creating spaces

Bryan Entzminger:

for people to connect and I can be there and meet people there.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I'm trying to do it a little, so that, that tends to be a longer sales

Bryan Entzminger:

cycle, but it's more comfortable to me.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I would say, I think I could, but probably not the first couple of months.

Bryan Entzminger:

Of

Stevie Manns:

course now I'm sure I'm, you know, and that's, that's kind of the

Stevie Manns:

whole point of this conversation in some, to some extent is like, do you build it

Stevie Manns:

up to a hundred percent and banquet or do you build it up to 70% and then quit?

Stevie Manns:

Or do you like, where, where is it for most.

Bryan Entzminger:

I mean, I can't speak for most people.

Bryan Entzminger:

I think we're where I would be comfortable is in that 50

Bryan Entzminger:

to 75% range where I go, okay.

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm most of the way there.

Bryan Entzminger:

And if I had an additional 40 hours a week, I think I could

Bryan Entzminger:

fill this gap pretty quickly.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, where I'm at right now is more like 25 to 30% of the way there.

Bryan Entzminger:

And that has me a lot less comfortable.

Bryan Entzminger:

Okay.

Stevie Manns:

I have a question that somewhat it's sort of related and it's

Stevie Manns:

around finding clients sort of, um, how active are you guys on social media?

Stevie Manns:

And for me

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm fairly active in like the podcasting groups, that those

Bryan Entzminger:

kinds of places I'm not as active, um, going out and specifically targeting

Bryan Entzminger:

like business owners or things like that.

Bryan Entzminger:

So

Stevie Manns:

you engage in like the Facebook groups, but

Stevie Manns:

I guess maybe my question is like, do you post as an editor?

Stevie Manns:

Are you like, sort of trying to create, I'm not, I don't mean to say

Stevie Manns:

an influencer, but are you trying to kind of create a persona as, as

Stevie Manns:

that, are you trying to sort of create content to demonstrate what you do?

Bryan Entzminger:

I tend to spend most of my time answering questions, which I

Bryan Entzminger:

like to think of as demonstrating ability, although, um, it doesn't translate to

Bryan Entzminger:

sales is probably as often I've moved into a little bit more of the content

Bryan Entzminger:

creation side on Instagram and really around the, like addressing some of those.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't want to say stupid.

Bryan Entzminger:

Some of the questionable things that I, that I see going on where like, you

Bryan Entzminger:

know, which microphone should I buy?

Bryan Entzminger:

Well, if you don't know what you're gonna talk about, it doesn't matter.

Bryan Entzminger:

So let's, let's figure that like, I mean, if you got nothing to say, who cares,

Bryan Entzminger:

what you sound like, that means that.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Thinking about starting a podcast, I'm trying very out how to make money from

Daniel Abendroth:

it, but I don't have a topic, but yet.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

And, and it's for everybody, it's

Bryan Entzminger:

just whoever wants to listen.

Bryan Entzminger:

Like, no.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

I think there's more important things to worry about before you

Daniel Abendroth:

start thinking about monetization.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um,

Stevie Manns:

well I asked that question because I think in this sort of Xi podcast

Stevie Manns:

space, there are a number of people who are, you know, promoting themselves on

Stevie Manns:

Instagram and they're creating reels of by like, oh, you know, um, what are

Stevie Manns:

some of the top tip, uh, the top tips or the top pitfalls of being in podcasting

Stevie Manns:

or like how to get clients or, or, you know, and there's a lot of like space

Stevie Manns:

for, um, podcast producers or editors or people who like, you know, want to

Stevie Manns:

launch clients or things like that.

Stevie Manns:

And they're, and it's, for me, it sort of, it has this sort of, um, it's got

Stevie Manns:

this look about it and it sort of, you know, shiny and that for Instagram,

Stevie Manns:

and that's the way that you get seen and potentially get clients that way.

Stevie Manns:

And I'm I'm, I don't necessarily know.

Stevie Manns:

From the male perspective.

Stevie Manns:

I definitely see it from this sort of female perspective.

Stevie Manns:

Cause you know, in that sort of thirties, female it's, it's got a look to it.

Stevie Manns:

I don't know how to say that diplomatically, but it does

Stevie Manns:

have a nice, shiny look to it.

Bryan Entzminger:

It's not me.

Stevie Manns:

I just wonder if there's a, there's an equivalent for you guys.

Stevie Manns:

So,

Bryan Entzminger:

uh, I will say that I've been working on that kind of thing.

Bryan Entzminger:

And recently I thought about resurrecting a show that I've got on

Bryan Entzminger:

pause right now so that I can actually create a show that has the content

Bryan Entzminger:

that I would want to share anyway.

Bryan Entzminger:

And then also share that content, for example, on Instagram or Twitter or

Bryan Entzminger:

something like that too, to basically try and leverage those channels.

Bryan Entzminger:

Not necessarily to get people, to subscribe to my show, but

Bryan Entzminger:

to say here's a show that I.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

So you can hear that.

Bryan Entzminger:

I actually know what I'm doing.

Bryan Entzminger:

Like it doesn't suck.

Bryan Entzminger:

And also if you want to work with me, then here's me.

Bryan Entzminger:

So that's what I've been thinking about it.

Bryan Entzminger:

Daniel, what about you like social is kind of your jam, right?

Daniel Abendroth:

I oh yeah, totally.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, if you look at my Instagram feed, I think I posted two

Daniel Abendroth:

years ago was my last one.

Daniel Abendroth:

And I think I have four total pictures and one of them might be my dog.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, so no, I don't do so.

Daniel Abendroth:

I kind of like what Brian was saying, like I'm in the podcast

Daniel Abendroth:

groups answering questions.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, but as far as like PR like creating content is not something I

Daniel Abendroth:

do right now, um, because I've been fortunate that I've been able to grow

Daniel Abendroth:

the business through word of mouth.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, so I don't really have a need.

Daniel Abendroth:

And so with that being said that I have not put an effort into social media.

Daniel Abendroth:

One thing that makes me hesitant from what I've seen in podcast groups

Daniel Abendroth:

is that the majority of people are.

Daniel Abendroth:

That are on social media and podcasting.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, looking for answers are new to podcasting and hobbyists.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, and they are not.

Daniel Abendroth:

So if I were to do social media, I'd have to make sure that I target very

Daniel Abendroth:

well because I don't want to attract all podcasts because most of them wouldn't

Daniel Abendroth:

be a, they're not my ideal client.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like they wouldn't be able, they wouldn't be willing to pay what I charge.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I'd have to like, be very strategic in targeting who I want.

Daniel Abendroth:

How

Bryan Entzminger:

about you, Stevie?

Bryan Entzminger:

Are you, uh, are you working on that?

Stevie Manns:

I had a good go at it last year for a few months and

Stevie Manns:

with everything that I had going on, I was like, I need to drop this,

Stevie Manns:

but, um, it's interesting because.

Stevie Manns:

I feel like, you know, certainly as a creative it's like, you need

Stevie Manns:

to have a social media presence and you need to, you know, post

Stevie Manns:

some fun facts about podcasting.

Stevie Manns:

Like, I don't know, there were 2 million podcasts at the beginning

Stevie Manns:of:Stevie Manns:

and like interesting facts about podcasts that people might not know.

Stevie Manns:

And, you know, just sort of say, oh, Hey, you know, I noticed don't let podcasting,

Stevie Manns:

you should hire me for your next job.

Stevie Manns:

Um, but I am starting to see a lot of people, again, sort of in this sort

Stevie Manns:

of female sort of non binary space posting a lot of rules about like, oh,

Stevie Manns:

hi, to make your podcast successful.

Stevie Manns:

And I'm so curious about it because I'm like how much of this is good

Stevie Manns:

content or good advice, um, slash you know, and, um, and I think from my

Stevie Manns:

perspective, like I have, I'm not, I'm not, not to say that I'm, I'm an expert.

Stevie Manns:

I'm not an expert.

Stevie Manns:

I don't, I'm not an audio engineer, but I do have a fairly long

Stevie Manns:

background in radio and an audio.

Stevie Manns:

But I, I do wonder how much of it is style over substance.

Stevie Manns:

And, you know, part of me is curious to explore that and I like, and I'll

Stevie Manns:

be honest, I've bought a couple of these sort of like buy my course for

Stevie Manns:

50 bucks and I'm like, okay, fine.

Stevie Manns:

I'll buy your course for 25 bucks or 50 bucks.

Stevie Manns:

And I'll see what you offer.

Stevie Manns:

And I'm like, is it, do I think it's worth it?

Stevie Manns:

And just to sort of see what people are positioning themselves as, and there

Stevie Manns:

are some people that are like, Carrie is great and actually it's social media

Stevie Manns:

and also has a lot of courses that she's, you know, she, she positioned

Stevie Manns:

herself really well, but there are some people who I think are, are like very

Stevie Manns:

Instagram pretty, um, that I don't think necessarily are up to scrub to Scruff.

Stevie Manns:

That's not snuff.

Stevie Manns:

Snuff.

Stevie Manns:

Thank you.

Stevie Manns:

I was going to say scrubs snuff, um, when it comes to the actual, like value

Stevie Manns:

of the content that they're providing.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't, I mean, I've seen a couple of people, like I think paroma,

Bryan Entzminger:

I've seen some of her reals and.

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm familiar with her.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't know about any courses or anything.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't know that she has any, but definitely the content that I see her

Bryan Entzminger:

putting out on Instagram is solid.

Bryan Entzminger:

Like she she's putting out stuff that I'm like, yeah, I could stand behind that.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, I mean, we have different styles, but that's fine.

Bryan Entzminger:

You know, she's, she's putting out the truth.

Bryan Entzminger:

I think that's great.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Stevie Manns:

Oh, she's she's killing it.

Daniel Abendroth:

Uh, Ashley commented.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

I've always found it difficult to find the right balance of posting enough

Daniel Abendroth:

on social media and feeling completely overwhelmed by it as an artist and

Daniel Abendroth:

an audio editor slash engineer.

Bryan Entzminger:

I haven't posted yet this week on Instagram.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cause I just got overwhelmed with the production process.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I was going for three times a week.

Bryan Entzminger:

Like I know you're supposed to do multiple times a day.

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm like, forget it.

Bryan Entzminger:

I can, maybe I can do Monday, Wednesday, Friday this week.

Bryan Entzminger:

Nothing.

Bryan Entzminger:

We'll see you button next

Daniel Abendroth:

week.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Stevie Manns:

I mean, there are ways to do it, I guess, where you sort of plan

Stevie Manns:

out your month and it depends what you do.

Stevie Manns:

Some of your stuff is evergreen, and then you can just like take

Stevie Manns:

a day planet, get later gram or whatever, and then just it's done.

Stevie Manns:

Um, it depends what you, what your podcast is or what it is that you do.

Stevie Manns:

And if it's, you know, going to be topical or not, um, if your podcast

Stevie Manns:

is news topical, good luck because you have to be on it all the time.

Stevie Manns:

Like thank you.

Stevie Manns:

But like, you know, if you're, if you're a nerd like me and you do star Trek or

Stevie Manns:

whatever, you can just create memes and do it all in a day and then you're done.

Stevie Manns:

Um, although I, I admit I'm, I'm slightly behind on doing that, but it can be done.

Stevie Manns:

It's easy.

Stevie Manns:

Do you know Kelly, right?

Stevie Manns:

No.

Stevie Manns:

Oh, Kelly, right?

Stevie Manns:

Yes.

Stevie Manns:

I think it's a Kelly.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yes.

Daniel Abendroth:

Kelly.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

I see.

Daniel Abendroth:

She's always talking about star Trek.

Stevie Manns:

I think we have connected and all that.

Stevie Manns:

Yeah.

Stevie Manns:

I love, I love the world of Facebook and social media.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah, one of the things I'm wondering about your

Bryan Entzminger:

transition, uh, cause we've talked about the, the day job and how that's

Bryan Entzminger:

coming to an end due to some stuff.

Bryan Entzminger:

W besides getting clients, have you done anything to help prepare yourself,

Bryan Entzminger:

uh, financially or legally or whatever to start making this transition?

Stevie Manns:

Um, that's partly a lie.

Stevie Manns:

It's slightly tricky because of my situation.

Stevie Manns:

So I, I have one of the things that I want to do is create an LLC, um,

Stevie Manns:

so that I can one expense stuff.

Stevie Manns:

Um, The things that I'm, you know, there, there are a few things that I'm investing

Stevie Manns:

in and I want to, to offset them tax wise.

Stevie Manns:

So from a sort of tax and legal perspective, that's

Stevie Manns:

certainly what I want to do.

Stevie Manns:

I'm I need to consult somebody about whether or not I can do that within

Stevie Manns:

this particular period before, because as I say, I'm, I'm currently waiting

Stevie Manns:

for a green card, so I'm not sure what I'm allowed to do within this period.

Stevie Manns:

So yeah.

Stevie Manns:

But yes, I have considered that.

Stevie Manns:

Um, and again, I think, you know, this is a period where I'm in some

Stevie Manns:

sorts of limbo and, but I think it's certainly worth getting an LLC because

Stevie Manns:

my investment in myself and, um, my business, even whether my business is

Stevie Manns:

going to be, you know, if I, if I, you know, say for instance, I decide that

Stevie Manns:

I want to work for a production company or, you know, do something in, in, you

Stevie Manns:

know, a vein where I'm, I'm considered an employee versus self-employed.

Stevie Manns:

Then I still think having my.

Stevie Manns:

Company would allow me to do some of this sort of tax stuff, which I

Stevie Manns:

think would be really beneficial.

Stevie Manns:

But I think I would still want to continue doing my own clients on the side, in

Stevie Manns:

which case it would still be beneficial.

Stevie Manns:

So yes, I have considered it.

Stevie Manns:

Um, and there is, uh, somebody, I think, within the, the sheet podcast space that

Stevie Manns:

I've, I've spoken to about doing that.

Bryan Entzminger:

Cool.

Bryan Entzminger:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's, that's something I continue to think about as well.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I'm interested in your perspective,

Stevie Manns:

have you, you

Bryan Entzminger:

and you haven't done it yet?

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, I have not yet formed an LLC.

Bryan Entzminger:

I do have a business license and all that stuff, but I've not yet

Bryan Entzminger:

formed an LLC, which is on my list.

Bryan Entzminger:

Uh, it's probably not quite as expensive in Tennessee as it is in,

Bryan Entzminger:

uh, New York, but it's not free.

Daniel Abendroth:

Well, Brian, so Heather asked earlier in the Facebook group.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, so I'm curious what your thoughts are as you kind of look forward, but

Daniel Abendroth:

like having a financial, like an umbrella saved up in order to kind of be stable.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Bryan Entzminger:

So I have some thoughts and I'm not there yet, but I

Bryan Entzminger:

think when I think about trying to make sure that I'm comfortable and I'm not

Bryan Entzminger:

putting my family at undue risk, right.

Bryan Entzminger:

Where my thoughts are, would be call it savings in the range of four to

Bryan Entzminger:

six months of basic expenses for the business, as well as for the family.

Bryan Entzminger:

Right?

Bryan Entzminger:

So the mortgage gets paid, the electricity stays on.

Bryan Entzminger:

I still have the internet so I can work.

Bryan Entzminger:

Uh, and then probably somewhere in the range of 50 to 70% of what I would

Bryan Entzminger:

call salary replacement, which is actually ideally more right, because

Bryan Entzminger:

you have to plan for taxes differently and there's some other I got.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so my mind is in the range of 50 to 70%, but that would be 50 to 70%

Bryan Entzminger:

based on what I think I would take home from the business after I've

Bryan Entzminger:

covered taxes and covered expenses.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, and so I'm not quite sure.

Bryan Entzminger:

But it's a squishy number, but that's where I'm at or where I want

Daniel Abendroth:

to be.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I do want to go back because Andrea, let me see if I can find out

Daniel Abendroth:

how to comment that I wanted to cover.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Uh, so Andrea said, my challenge with structure is how much time

Daniel Abendroth:

to allocate to client work versus admin versus business growth.

Daniel Abendroth:

It's like one part always seems to get the short shift or shrift anyway.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I know for me, like that's something I continually struggle with.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like for me, it's easy to designate enough time for client work, because

Daniel Abendroth:

like, I have deadlines if I want to get paid and want to retain these

Daniel Abendroth:

clients, I have to do client work.

Daniel Abendroth:

But as far as like business growth or up-skilling, or, um, admin tasks,

Daniel Abendroth:

because those are self-imposed deadlines.

Daniel Abendroth:

I struggle with that a little bit.

Daniel Abendroth:

So, do you guys have like any strategies or like how you handle it?

Bryan Entzminger:

My strategy would be to not use my strategy because it should

Bryan Entzminger:

be, what I would like to do is probably 30 to 60 minutes, a day of business

Bryan Entzminger:

development that would be developing content or relationship building or

Bryan Entzminger:

CRM management, that kind of thing.

Bryan Entzminger:

Uh, maybe ideally not more than 60 minutes a day of admin work and then the

Bryan Entzminger:

rest dedicated to production time or to strategic thinking or that kind of stuff.

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm not anywhere near that.

Bryan Entzminger:

I'm more like an hour a week maybe on, so on the things that

Bryan Entzminger:

actually matter for future growth.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

I think like admin work is for me, like less than probably you would expect.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I spend like.

Daniel Abendroth:

That's when a couple of hours, the first week of each month, just like finishing,

Daniel Abendroth:

wrapping up the previous month, getting all my, um, expenses in order to anything

Daniel Abendroth:

catalyze, reconciling my accounts, like to find like the accounting side of things.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, but beyond that, I don't really have a whole lot that I dedicate

Daniel Abendroth:

to like actually running the business beyond my client work.

Daniel Abendroth:

It's like upscaling and designating time to actually like improve

Daniel Abendroth:

myself as we're I struggle with,

Stevie Manns:

um, have you guys thought about, I mean, and I don't know if this

Stevie Manns:

has worked for you, but, um, and again, this is purely because of my corporate

Stevie Manns:

background is if I want to, like, if I want to do that, if I want to use my

Stevie Manns:

time for something, I will block it out and I will just do it within that time.

Stevie Manns:

And that means that no one can book time with me.

Stevie Manns:

Um, and that's the time that I dedicate to doing something.

Daniel Abendroth:

I think that's a good strategy that I need to implement

Daniel Abendroth:

is like just having a routine.

Daniel Abendroth:

It's like this time, like you're saying like, is it designated to whatever

Daniel Abendroth:

test and just kinda like get into a routine where I honor that each

Daniel Abendroth:

week and it just becomes a habit.

Bryan Entzminger:

I would say that I do that to some extent, probably

Bryan Entzminger:

not as strategically as I should, so I don't necessarily go next week,

Bryan Entzminger:

Friday, I'm going to do two hours of personal development, which is

Bryan Entzminger:

what I would do at my corporate job.

Bryan Entzminger:

Um, I tend to be more like I'm caught up on production work so I can either

Bryan Entzminger:

try and pull stuff ahead or I can invest in, you know, learning or business

Bryan Entzminger:

development or something like that.

Bryan Entzminger:

And so I tend to make the decision a little bit more laissez-faire

Bryan Entzminger:

than I should, but that's, that's how, um, good, bad and ugly.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's how I do

Stevie Manns:

it in this room to be flexible because, and the way that I

Stevie Manns:

think about it is like, if I work out, um, So I'll have my five days and I'll

Stevie Manns:

do whatever I do during those five days that I consider to be sort of

Stevie Manns:

working out and I will have at least one day that's like mobility or yoga.

Stevie Manns:

And I might go down to the gym and be like, yeah, I'm going to jump on the

Stevie Manns:

Peloton or I'm going to lift some weights.

Stevie Manns:

And I'm like, I really don't feel like it.

Stevie Manns:

Maybe today's why mobility day.

Stevie Manns:

And so then, you know, it's, it's so applying it back to the structuring

Stevie Manns:

of when do you do your admin, w when do you do your development?

Stevie Manns:

Um, it, you may be more productive, or you may not want to, I'm not

Stevie Manns:

saying procrastinate, but you may have days where it's better for you

Stevie Manns:

to do it certain days than others.

Stevie Manns:

Um, and somewhat, maybe trusting yourself to do that, but it's giving yourself the

Stevie Manns:

freedom and the flexibility to change the hard structure that you set for yourself.

Bryan Entzminger:

W one of the things I so appreciate about this conversation

Bryan Entzminger:

is it's highlighting some of the lies.

Bryan Entzminger:

I like to tell myself, so

Daniel Abendroth:

yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

So I want to add just one final thought.

Daniel Abendroth:

As far as like structure goes is make sure that you give yourself time off.

Daniel Abendroth:

It's really easy when you work from home and like you run your own business

Daniel Abendroth:

to spend all your time on the business and not just take time for yourself.

Daniel Abendroth:

And when, when I do like there's some guilt associated, like there's

Daniel Abendroth:

work, I could be doing that.

Daniel Abendroth:

I shouldn't be doing blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Like you need time off.

Daniel Abendroth:

You need time to just kinda be, to enjoy yourself.

Daniel Abendroth:

So don't be making sure you give yourself that and don't feel guilty about it.

Daniel Abendroth:

Amen.

Daniel Abendroth:

So as we wrap up the show, Brian, do you want to hit us with our

Daniel Abendroth:

pod question of the episode?

Bryan Entzminger:

Yes.

Bryan Entzminger:

I've been waiting this whole episode to do this.

Bryan Entzminger:

I forgot to give you a choice.

Bryan Entzminger:

So we just got stuck with the one that I drew out of the thing,

Bryan Entzminger:

but today's podcast, pod decks.

Bryan Entzminger:

Question of the day slightly modified is who's your favorite hero of podcasting?

Stevie Manns:

I'm going to let Daniel answer this first.

Stevie Manns:

Oh

Daniel Abendroth:

wow.

Daniel Abendroth:

I like that.

Daniel Abendroth:

You go first.

Daniel Abendroth:

You're the one that I have no guests rules

Stevie Manns:

my hero of podcasting.

Stevie Manns:

I say,

Bryan Entzminger:

since she's not here, my hero of podcasting will be Carrie

Bryan Entzminger:

because not only is she excellent at what she does, but she's an incredible

Bryan Entzminger:

advocate for podcasting and for making sure that people get the attention

Bryan Entzminger:

that they do deserve, not just the same three people over and over.

Stevie Manns:

I'll second that I think like I have yet to meet Carrie in person.

Stevie Manns:

We have spoken, but I see Carrie consistently raise people up.

Stevie Manns:

And I love that.

Stevie Manns:

I, you know, I know that like the Xi podcast group is great for doing

Stevie Manns:

that, but Carrie is really good at it.

Daniel Abendroth:

Yeah.

Daniel Abendroth:

Unfortunately, Carrie couldn't join us due to internet outage

Daniel Abendroth:

that she's been dealing with.

Daniel Abendroth:

She says,

Stevie Manns:

that's how you get very close to Mike.

Stevie Manns:

And you say that

Daniel Abendroth:

stumped on Don.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't think there's much proximity effect on this.

Bryan Entzminger:

Sorry.

Stevie Manns:

I think I do have a done, done, done.

Stevie Manns:

I'm not sure if my, uh, I've got my red mic on, but

Daniel Abendroth:

so for me, um, I know we talk about them all the time, but

Daniel Abendroth:

Steve Stewart, uh, just in my experience, it's what he's done with the podcast

Daniel Abendroth:

editors club that, um, empowered me to actually charge what I'm worth.

Daniel Abendroth:

And without that, I wouldn't have been able to.

Daniel Abendroth:

Do this full time.

Daniel Abendroth:

Cause I just, I was undercharging by so much and because of the group, because of

Daniel Abendroth:

what he's done, um, I realized my worth.

Daniel Abendroth:

So Steve Stewart,

Stevie Manns:

I love Steve.

Stevie Manns:

He's great.

Stevie Manns:

I love his, um, his quarterly emails.

Stevie Manns:

So I dunno, I dunno if you guys did this, but I replied to some email

Stevie Manns:

and it was like, what are your, what are your goals for the year?

Stevie Manns:

And I like, he checks in every quarter and he has a full

Stevie Manns:

conversation with you about it.

Stevie Manns:

I love that.

Stevie Manns:

And he's, he's just, I, I, yeah, I absolutely agree with that.

Stevie Manns:

Um, but if I have to choose somebody different, the two that you've chosen,

Stevie Manns:

um, mine would be Elsie, Elsie Escobar.

Stevie Manns:

Nice.

Stevie Manns:

Okay.

Stevie Manns:

Yeah.

Stevie Manns:

I love Elsie.

Stevie Manns:

She's.

Stevie Manns:

She's great.

Stevie Manns:

Um, so supportive, no question is a stupid question.

Stevie Manns:

Like given what she does and how integrated she is and everything.

Stevie Manns:

Um, what, she's, what she and Jess had been able to create where she podcasts,

Stevie Manns:

I think has been it's it's all inspiring.

Stevie Manns:

It's great.

Daniel Abendroth:

Love it.

Daniel Abendroth:

Thank you so much for coming on the show, Stevie.

Daniel Abendroth:

Um, it's been absolutely wonderful and thank you everybody.

Daniel Abendroth:

Who's here watching live, and those that are listening, um, to the podcast.

Daniel Abendroth:

If you want to be a guest on the show, Brian, do you wanna let them know what to

Bryan Entzminger:

do?

Bryan Entzminger:

Oh yeah, this is, this is the best go to podcast editors,

Bryan Entzminger:

mastermind.com/be a guest.

Bryan Entzminger:

That's all one word slash be a guest, put all your information

Bryan Entzminger:

in there and hit send.

Bryan Entzminger:

And that will magically transport it directly to Daniel's spam folder.

Bryan Entzminger:

And every couple of weeks he will check that and he will find your email and he

Bryan Entzminger:

will pull it out and he will email you back and we'll work to get you set up,

Bryan Entzminger:

uh, so that we can get you on this show.

Bryan Entzminger:

Whether you're an expert with something you want to share with

Bryan Entzminger:

the community, or if you've got questions, there's a business struggle.

Bryan Entzminger:

You're working on something like that.

Bryan Entzminger:

Or you just want to hang out and chat about how.

Bryan Entzminger:

Podcasts, edit and change your life.

Bryan Entzminger:

I don't know.

Bryan Entzminger:

All that kind of stuff.

Bryan Entzminger:

Podcasts, editors, mastermind.com/be a

Stevie Manns:

guest.

Stevie Manns:

Oh, could you make it be our guests?

Stevie Manns:

And then we could sing the song.

Stevie Manns:

We

Bryan Entzminger:

talked about that, but then there's Disney.

Bryan Entzminger:

Like they're super like they will Sue you.

Stevie Manns:

Yes, they will.

Stevie Manns:

Listen guys.

Stevie Manns:

Thank you so much for having me on.

Stevie Manns:

It's been, it's been so enlightening to have this conversation with you

Stevie Manns:

and I really appreciate, thank you.

Daniel Abendroth:

This has been fun.

Daniel Abendroth:

Uh, I'm Daniel Abendroth.

Daniel Abendroth:

You can find me at Roth media audio.

Bryan Entzminger:

I am Brian and Springer.

Bryan Entzminger:

You can find me@toptieraudio.com.

Stevie Manns:

Oh, hi, I'm CV fans.

Stevie Manns:

And you can find me at Stevie Kent dull NYC.

Stevie Manns:

It's not confusing.

Stevie Manns:

I just got married and changed my name

Daniel Abendroth:

and Carrie Coffield.

Daniel Abendroth:

Eric could not join us tonight, but you can find her@yalepodcasting.com.

Daniel Abendroth:

Thank you so much.

Daniel Abendroth:

And we'll see you next time.

About the author, Bryan Entzminger

Bryan Entzminger is the owner of Top Tier Audio, a podcast production company. He's also the founder of the Hindy Users (Unofficial) group for Hindenburg users on Facebook, and a co-host of Podcast Editors Mastermind — a podcast focused on the business side of podcast editing. He loves sharing the lessons he’s learned from his struggles and others he's met along the way so that you can have a podcast that you’re proud of without letting editing take over your life.

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